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Congressman, climate change activist honored with JFK awards

November 17, 2017 GMT
FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2017 file photo, Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., right, stands with Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, discussing the GOP agenda for tax reform during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Curbelo is one of two people who will be honored with the John F. Kennedy New Frontier Awards, Thursday evening, Nov. 16, 2017, at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2017 file photo, Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., right, stands with Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, discussing the GOP agenda for tax reform during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Curbelo is one of two people who will be honored with the John F. Kennedy New Frontier Awards, Thursday evening, Nov. 16, 2017, at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2017 file photo, Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., right, stands with Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, discussing the GOP agenda for tax reform during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Curbelo is one of two people who will be honored with the John F. Kennedy New Frontier Awards, Thursday evening, Nov. 16, 2017, at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — A Republican congressman from Florida and the leader of a national campaign to address climate change have been honored with this year’s John F. Kennedy New Frontier Awards.

JFK’s grandson, Jack Schlossberg, presented the awards Thursday night to U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo and environmental advocacy group 350.org executive director May Boeve.

Schlossberg says both recipients answered his grandfather’s call by tackling climate change.

In 2016, Curbelo helped form the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus in Congress.

The awards were created to honor Americans under the age of 40 and were inspired by Kennedy’s acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention in 1960 when he said, in part, “We stand today on the edge of a New Frontier.”

The ceremony was held at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.