PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's issuance of a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline (all times local):

6 p.m.

Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault says the tribe will oppose the newly approved Keystone XL pipeline on all fronts.

President Donald Trump's administration issued a permit Friday to build the $8 billion project, reversing the Obama administration.

The Standing Rock Sioux, whose reservation straddles the North Dakota-South Dakota border, have been key opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline. Archambault says the tribe hopes that Dakota Access opponents continue to stand with all tribes in the fight against such "dangerous and short-sighted infrastructure projects."

Members of South Dakota's all-Republican congressional delegation say the Trump administration's approval of the pipeline will help encourage economic growth.

It would move crude oil from Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with existing pipelines feeding refineries along the Gulf Coast.

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11:55 a.m.

Members of South Dakota's congressional delegation say the Trump administration's approval of the Keystone XL pipeline will help encourage economic growth.

Sen. John Thune and Rep. Kristi Noem, both Republicans, on Friday celebrated the decision to issue a permit to build the $8 billion project.

It would move crude oil from Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with existing pipelines feeding refineries along the Gulf Coast.

Noem says the pipeline's construction will mean added revenue for South Dakota counties and relief on the state's roads and rails. Thune says he's glad Trump took quick action to approve the "critical infrastructure project."

Native American tribes, some landowners and environmental groups oppose the pipeline, fearing it would contaminate water supplies and contribute to pollution.

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8:41 a.m.

South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard says that he welcomes the Trump administration's approval of the Keystone XL pipeline and hopes people will exercise their First Amendment rights peacefully.

President Donald Trump's administration issued a permit Friday to build the $8 billion project, reversing the Obama administration and clearing the way for the pipeline to finally be completed.

Daugaard says the decision is a victory for "all of us who rely on oil to heat our homes, fuel our cars and power our tractors." Foes fear it would contaminate water supplies and contribute to pollution.

The pipeline would move crude oil from Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with existing pipelines feeding refineries along the Gulf Coast.