AP NEWS

FEMA program will take Camp Fire trees on private property

September 26, 2019 GMT
1 of 3
FILE - This Aug. 21, 2019 file photo shows burned trees surrounding the burned out remains of a home destroyed by last year's Camp Fire, in Paradise, Calif. A federal hazard tree-removal program will remove destroyed trees from last year's deadly Camp Fire that remain on private property and could fall on public roads and facilities. But the Chico Enterprise-Record reports that the Federal Emergency Management Agency program will not take down trees that could fall on homes. Some arborists have estimated there are half a million to a million burned trees remaining from the fire that wiped out 14,000 homes and killed 85 last November. Loss of home insurance or spiking policy prices are one consequence of California's deadly and destructive wildfires in recent years. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
1 of 3
FILE - This Aug. 21, 2019 file photo shows burned trees surrounding the burned out remains of a home destroyed by last year's Camp Fire, in Paradise, Calif. A federal hazard tree-removal program will remove destroyed trees from last year's deadly Camp Fire that remain on private property and could fall on public roads and facilities. But the Chico Enterprise-Record reports that the Federal Emergency Management Agency program will not take down trees that could fall on homes. Some arborists have estimated there are half a million to a million burned trees remaining from the fire that wiped out 14,000 homes and killed 85 last November. Loss of home insurance or spiking policy prices are one consequence of California's deadly and destructive wildfires in recent years. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

OROVILLE, Calif. (AP) — A federally funded government hazard tree-removal program will remove destroyed trees from last year’s deadly Camp Fire that remain on private property and could fall on public roads and facilities.

But the Chico Enterprise-Record reports that the Federal Emergency Management Agency program will not take down trees that could fall on homes.

The agreement to take trees on private property was reached after negotiations between the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and federal officials on behalf of the town of Paradise and Butte County, which had asked for the funding.

Some arborists have estimated there are half a million to a million burned trees remaining from the Camp Fire, which tore through Northern California last Nov. 8, destroying 14,000 homes and killing 85.