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Countryside Refind opens new downtown Baraboo location

June 9, 2018

Spotting a tarnished gem and making it shine again is nothing new for Dana Ender and Jennifer Loveless. They opened Countryside Refind three years ago to create an outlet for the vintage furniture and décor they refurbish. They’ve spent the past two months turning their attention to the downtown storefront their business now calls home.

Countryside Refind opens today at its new location, 115 Third Ave. Most recently used for storage by a nearby bank, it hasn’t housed a retail store for years. But when Ender and Loveless saw the place, it was as if they’d spotted a bureau in need of tender loving care.

“We completely gutted this place, front to back,” Ender said.

The longtime friends opened Countryside Refind on Fourth Avenue in March 2015. They outgrew that 1,600-foot space as demand for their refurbished furniture, vintage décor and custom-made signs — not to mention their painting classes — increased.

“We were completely running out of space,” Ender said.

They started looking for a new location about a year ago. Hoping to stay downtown, they toured several potential landing spots before buying 115 Third Ave.

“We kept always kept coming back to this place,” Ender said.

They’ve spent the past two months moving inventory and renovating their new two-story, 7,000 square-foot space. Workers installed light fixtures Thursday as paper covered windows that soon will offer a clear view of the Sauk County courthouse lawn. “Being more visible here is going to be beneficial,” Loveless said. “It’s close to everything.”

The new location provides significantly more studio space for painting classes, plus a larger sales floor that allowed the owners to add new lines of products. The store’s living room, kitchen and bedroom illustrate for customers how vintage pieces can be used to create homey ambiance.

“We like to show people how to display items,” Loveless said.

Upstairs, they’ve opened a business incubator where they’re renting to several tenants who are trying to launch small businesses.

Ender and Loveless got their start attending craft fairs, realizing they could create the same types of pieces without paying retail prices. Eventually their hobby grew into a business partnership. “We said, ‘We can do this,’” Ender said.

Today will bring a “soft opening,” with a grand opening to follow at a later date. The owners and their crew are still applying some finishing touches, such as a paint job on the storefront. They’re down to the details and ready to show customers their latest reclamation project.

“That’s what we do,” Loveless said. “We give it our all and get it done.”