AP NEWS
Related topics

BC-AP Top Stories Digest

January 17, 2019

Here are the AP’s latest coverage plans, top stories and promotable content. All times EST. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at https://newsroom.ap.org .

----------------

ONLY ON AP

----------------

WHO MISCONDUCT INVESTIGATION — The head of the World Health Organization orders an internal investigation into allegations the U.N. health agency is rife with racism, sexism and corruption, after a series of anonymous emails with the explosive charges were sent to top managers last year. The emails allege numerous instances of wrongdoing, including that money intended to fight Ebola in Congo was misspent. By Medical Writer Maria Cheng. SENT: 910 words, photo.

----------------

TOP STORIES

----------------

IMMIGRATION-SEPARATING FAMILIES — Thousands more migrant children were likely separated from their parents than the Trump administration has acknowledged, in part because officials started splitting up families long before the policy prompted international outrage last spring, a government watchdog says. By Colleen Long and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar. SENT: 430 words, photo. UPCOMING: 750 words by 3 p.m.

TRUMP-RUSSIA PROBE — President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani now says he “never said there was no collusion” between Russia and members of Trump’s 2016 White House campaign, contradicting public positions that he and his client have taken. Giuliani appears to have left open the possibility of improper contacts. By Eric Tucker. SENT 510 words, photo.

MISSILE DEFENSE — President Donald Trump says space is the new warfighting domain and he pledges to protect America with a missile defense system able to detect and destroy any weapon launched “anywhere, anytime, any place.” By Deb Riechmann and Lolita C. Baldor. SENT: 830 words, photos. UPCOMING: 750 words by 3 p.m.

COLOMBIA-BOMBING — At least nine people were killed and dozens more injured in a car bombing at a police academy in Colombia’s capital on Thursday, recalling the high-profile attacks associated with bloodiest chapters of the country’s drug-fueled guerrilla conflict. By Cesar Garcia. SENT: 750 words, photos.

GOVERNTMENT SHUTDOWN-BENEFITS — Thousands of federal employees and their families are applying for unemployment and food stamps as the longest government shutdown in U.S. history drags on, putting themselves in the potentially uncomfortable position of having to pay back the benefits whenever they return to work. By Michelle Smith. UPCOMING: 800 words, photos, by 4 p.m.

DOCTOR-SEXUAL ASSAULT-MICHIGAN STATE — With the ouster of interim president John Engler, Michigan State University and its new-look governing board are hoping to finally heal wounds from the Larry Nassar sex abuse scandal and move the school beyond its darkest chapter. It starts with a new temporary leader, Satish Udpa, a high-ranking university administrator who was promoted Thursday to take the helm until a permanent president is announced in June. By David Eggert and Corey Williams. SENT: 975 words, photos. UPCOMING: New approach by 3 p.m.

OPIOID CRISIS-PHILANTHROPY — The Sackler name adorns walls at some of the world’s top museums and universities, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim and Harvard. But the family’s ties to the powerful painkiller OxyContin and the drug’s role in the nation’s deadly opioid crisis are bringing a new kind of attention to the Sacklers and their philanthropic legacy. By Alanna Durkin Richer. UPCOMING: 700 words by 4 p.m., photos.

-----------------------------------------------

MORE ON GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

----------------------------------------------

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN-MCCONNELL — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has been conspicuously deferential in the shutdown debate, standing aside to let President Donald Trump deal with Democrats. McConnell sees no other choice than to wait for a president who took the country into the shutdown to decide how he wants to get out of it. UPCOMING: 800 words, photos by 4 p.m.

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN — The State Department tells U.S. diplomats to return to work and says it’s found money to pay them despite the government shutdown. SENT: 450 words, photos.

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN-WILDFIRES — Just two months after a wildfire wiped out Paradise, California, officials are gearing up for this year’s fire season and fear the government shutdown could make it even more difficult than the last, one of the worst in history. SENT: 830 words, photos.

------------------------------

WASHINGTON/POLITICS

------------------------------

UNITED STATES-NKOREA — High-level talks aimed at finalizing a second summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are expected Friday in Washington, U.S. officials say, with a possible White House visit afterward by the North’s envoy. By Matthew Lee and Deb Riechmann. SENT: 450 words, photos.

ELECTION 2020-DEMOCRATS-TRUMP — Democrats in the 2020 White House race must decide how and whether to respond to President Donald Trump’s personal attacks on his political opponents. Punch back too hard and stand accused of playing his game. Ignore him and risk appearing unprepared. By Elana Schor and Thomas Beaumont. SENT: 1,040 words, photos.

--------------------

INTERNATIONAL

--------------------

BREXIT — A weakened but defiant Prime Minister Theresa May meets lawmakers from Britain’s rival Brexit factions to try to forge a replacement for her rejected European Union exit plan. SENT: 950 words, photos. With BREXIT-EUROPE — Airports, customs, trade: Europe preps for a chaotic Brexit (sent).

-------------

NATIONAL

-------------

LOS ANGELES TEACHERS-STRIKE — Teachers walked rainy picket lines at Los Angeles schools for a fourth day ahead of a new round of contract negotiations that a union leader said is unlikely to end the walkout. SENT: 500 words, photos.

WISCONSIN KILLINGS-KIDNAPPING — Wisconsin man suspected of kidnapping 13-year-old Jayme Closs and killing her parents apparently applied for a job online with a liquor company the day that Jayme escaped, calling himself an “honest guy.” SENT: 790 words, photos, video.

--------------------------

BUSINESS/ECONOMY

--------------------------

SEARS-SURVIVAL — Sears is confirming reports its chairman and largest shareholder Eddie Lampert’s hedge fund has won a bid to buy roughly 400 stores and other assets for $5.2 billion. SENT: 240 words, photos.

--------------------------

HEALTH/SCIENCE

--------------------------

SPACE CRASHES — You don’t have to keep glancing up, but the sky really is falling more than twice as often as it used to. For the past 290 million years, big space rocks have been crashing into the Earth and moon at more than twice the rate of a couple billion years ago. They’re still rare, but tell that to the dinosaurs. It’s all based on the number of big craters on the moon. SENT: 450 words, photos.

---------------------

ENTERTAINMENT

---------------------

MUSIC-GRAMMYWATCH-Q&A-PJ MORTON — PJ Morton is heading into the busiest month of his entire career: The Maroon 5 band member will perform at the Super Bowl halftime show on Feb. 2 and a week later, he will attend the Grammys, where he’s nominated for four honors, including three for his work as a solo R&B singer. By Music Writer Mesfin Fekadu. SENT: 1,400 words, photos.

FILM-OSCAR NOMINATIONS — Awards season tends to winnow a field of films and performances until many of the same names are read week after week, award show after award show. Here are just a few that will almost certainly not be among the names read among Tuesday’s Oscar nominations, but who warrant it as much as anyone. By Film Writer Jake Coyle. UPCOMING: 800 words by 2 p.m., photos.

CBS-MOONVES — Former CBS CEO Les Moonves is fighting the company’s decision to deny his $120 million severance package following his firing over sexual misconduct allegations. SENT: 130 words, photo.