AP NEWS

Letters To The Editor 1/9/2019

January 9, 2019
YOUR OPINION

Honor law enforcers

Editor: Every day, thousands of law enforcement officers across the country leave their families and loved ones at home while they protect the communities they serve.

Every law enforcement officer throughout Pennsylvania says goodbye to their families, not knowing if, when or in what condition they will arrive home. Yet every day, more than 27,000 police officers in Pennsylvania continue to uphold and defend the oath they took to protect the community.

Today is National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day. We encourage people to show support and gratitude for the officers who proudly wear blue and dedicate their lives to serving the public.

There are many ways you to show support:

■ Send a card of support to your local police department or state agency.

■ Participate in Project Blue Light by replacing your porch or landscape light with a blue light.

■ If you see a police officer grabbing a coffee, anonymously pay for the order.

■ Share positive law enforcement stories and experiences with the hashtag #BackTheBlue.

■ Wear blue to show your support for law enforcement.

Finally, just say thanks to an officer. Whenever you see law enforcement personnel, simply thank them for their service or wave and smile at passing officers. Officers put their lives on the line every day to ensure safe communities and thanking them shows our gratitude. On behalf of law enforcement, thanks for your continued support.

LES NERI

PRESIDENT,

FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE, PENNSYLVANIA STATE LODGE,

HARRISBURG

Elvis remembered

Editor: Interest in the legacy of Elvis Presley, who died in 1977 but would have turned 84 on Tuesday, is still popular.

Just recently, the Presidential Medal of Freedom was awarded in his honor. A new documentary about him, “The Searcher,” was released in 2018. Presley, known as “the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll” had it all — fame, looks, talent and the adoration of millions of fans. There was only one thing that eluded him, something he could not buy — peace of mind.

Elvis was plagued by insecurities, obsessions with death and separation. The public could actually hear his vulnerability in the song, “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” During a 1977 concert, he laughed, mumbled and stumbled over the spoken bridge of the song.

Why, on that song, did Elvis have so much trouble? Some say it may have been a Freudian slip. He seemed to feel unacceptable emotions that he could not express, so his feelings came out at a tender part of the song. During this time of his life, he was involved in a divorce, which was a reminder of his loss and pain.

A glimpse into Elvis’s psyche leads us to a vulnerable artist who, through music, coped with myriad issues. His pain is there for the public to hear. We can wonder what would have been if he found respite from his demons.

ROSE ZIELINSKI

THROOP

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