AP NEWS

The Latest: $30 car tabs leading in early voting returns

November 6, 2019
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Anti-tax activist Tim Eyman kneels and begs motorists to honk their horns as he holds a sign supporting Initiative 976, which would cut most car tabs to $30 in Washington state, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, on election day in Bellevue, Wash. If passed by voters, the measure would leave state and local governments scrambling to pay for road paving and other transportation projects. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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Anti-tax activist Tim Eyman kneels and begs motorists to honk their horns as he holds a sign supporting Initiative 976, which would cut most car tabs to $30 in Washington state, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, on election day in Bellevue, Wash. If passed by voters, the measure would leave state and local governments scrambling to pay for road paving and other transportation projects. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

SEATTLE (AP) — The Latest on a measure that would cap car tabs at $30 in Washington state (all times local):

8:35 p.m.

Voters in Washington state were supporting a $30 car tab initiative in early returns.

Tuesday night vote counts were showing the measure passing after the first votes were tallied in the all mail election.

Initiative 976 sponsored by Tim Eyman would decrease most taxes paid through annual vehicle registration and largely revoke the authority of state and local governments to add taxes and fees without voter approval.

Repealing existing taxes and fees could cost the state and local governments over $4 billion revenue over the next six years, according to the state Office of Financial Management.

A group funded mostly by Microsoft, Amazon, other businesses and labor unions poured nearly $5 million into opposing the initiative.

Ballots had to be postmarked or deposited in local drop boxes by 8 p.m. Tuesday. That means final results might not be known for days.

7:45 a.m.

Voters in Washington state are deciding whether to cut the price of most car tabs to $30, a measure that if passed would leave local and state governments scrambling to pay for road paving and other transportation projects.

Sponsored by Tim Eyman, Initiative 976 would decrease most taxes paid through annual vehicle registration and largely revoke the authority of state and local governments to add taxes and fees without voter approval.

The measure would also repeal taxes and fees that were already in place, which the state Office of Financial Management says could cost the state and local governments more than $4 billion in revenue over the next six years.

A group funded largely by Microsoft, Amazon, other businesses and labor unions has poured nearly $5 million into opposing the initiative.