AP NEWS

The Latest: Hong Kong police to enter university for cleanup

November 27, 2019
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University staff members inspect the campus of Polytechnic University in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019. A major tunnel in Hong Kong reopened on Wednesday as a weeklong police siege of the university appeared to be winding down, closing one of the more violent chapters in the city's anti-government protests. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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University staff members inspect the campus of Polytechnic University in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019. A major tunnel in Hong Kong reopened on Wednesday as a weeklong police siege of the university appeared to be winding down, closing one of the more violent chapters in the city's anti-government protests. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on protests in Hong Kong (all times local):

7:05 p.m.

Hong Kong police have announced plans to enter a blockaded university to clean up hazardous materials before lifting a 10-day siege, after civilian search teams found no evidence of any protesters still holding out.

Police district chief Ho Yun-sing says safety teams comprising explosive disposal experts will move into Polytechnic University on Thursday morning to gather evidence and remove stockpiles of chemicals and dangerous items including gasoline bombs and corrosive liquid.

He says the decision came after university search teams on Wednesday completed a second day of combing the trash-littered campus and failed to find anyone left behind. On Tuesday, one person was found — a young woman in weak condition.

He says the “ultimate goal is to restore the safety of the campus and to reopen the campus as soon as possible.”

University staff will assist in the cleanup.

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8:35 a.m.

A major tunnel in Hong Kong has reopened as a weeklong police siege of a nearby university appears to be winding down, closing one of the more violent chapters in the city’s anti-government protests.

The Cross-Harbour Tunnel, which links Hong Kong Island to the rest of the city, had been closed for two weeks after protesters blocked the approach with debris and set the toll booths on fire.

A search of the Hong Kong Polytechnic campus found just one woman, in weak condition, and a senior university official said it’s unlikely anyone else remains.

Attention meanwhile shifted to city leader Carrie Lam’s response to a major loss in local elections Sunday — a public rebuke of her tough line on the protests. Lam has offered no concessions.