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The Latest: Videotape evidence debated in newspaper shooting

October 1, 2019
FILE - This June 28, 2018, file photo provided by the Anne Arundel Police shows Jarrod Ramos in Annapolis, Md. Lawyers in the case of Ramos, who is accused of killing five people at a Maryland newspaper, are scheduled to continue arguing about evidence, as two days of pretrial hearings are set to begin Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019. (Anne Arundel Police via AP, File)
FILE - This June 28, 2018, file photo provided by the Anne Arundel Police shows Jarrod Ramos in Annapolis, Md. Lawyers in the case of Ramos, who is accused of killing five people at a Maryland newspaper, are scheduled to continue arguing about evidence, as two days of pretrial hearings are set to begin Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019. (Anne Arundel Police via AP, File)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The Latest on a pretrial hearing in the case of a man accused of killing five people at a Maryland newspaper (all times local):

12:25 p.m.

Defense attorneys for a man accused of killing five people at a Maryland newspaper are trying to prevent parts of graphic surveillance video of the attack from being shown at trial.

Defense attorney Elizabeth Palen said Tuesday that part of the video showing a wounded victim trying to escape is “inherently upsetting to watch” and would “unduly prejudice the jury.”

But Anne Arundel County State’s Attorney Anne Colt Leitess says the videotape shows the defendant Jarrod Ramos attacking the newsroom and is “the most important evidence in the case.”

Judge Laura Ripken says she will view the videotape before making a ruling. She says further arguments on the matter will be heard Wednesday.

Ramos has pleaded not guilty and not criminally responsible, Maryland’s version of an insanity defense.

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12:01 a.m.

Lawyers in the case of a man accused of killing five people at a Maryland newspaper are scheduled to continue arguing about evidence.

Two days of pretrial hearings are set to begin Tuesday in the case against Jarrod Ramos.

Defense attorneys have complained to Judge Laura Ripken that they don’t believe prosecutors have shared evidence with them properly, which prosecutors deny.

The defense also is asking the judge to block or restrict prosecutors from using evidence of other crimes or bad acts during the trial.

Ramos has pleaded not guilty and not criminally responsible, Maryland’s version of the insanity defense. He’s charged with five counts of first-degree murder and other charges.

Three days of jury selection are scheduled to begin Oct. 30. The trial is set to start Nov. 4.