AP NEWS

The Latest: $30 car tab measure passes in Washington

November 7, 2019
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A voter heads to a ballot drop box Monday, Nov. 4, 2019, in Seattle. Voters in Washington state have a crowded ballot to fill out for this week's election, with a referendum on affirmative action and an initiative on the price of car tabs among the things they are being asked to decide. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
1 of 5
A voter heads to a ballot drop box Monday, Nov. 4, 2019, in Seattle. Voters in Washington state have a crowded ballot to fill out for this week's election, with a referendum on affirmative action and an initiative on the price of car tabs among the things they are being asked to decide. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

SEATTLE (AP) — The Latest on a measure that would cap car tabs at $30 in Washington state (all times local):

4:07 p.m.

Washington state voters have approved a measure cutting car tabs to $30, a move that will cut billions of dollars from transportation budgets and leave governments scrambling for a way to pay for road paving, light rail and other projects.

Initiative 976 had a healthy lead after early returns Tuesday night and continued to pass by large margins as votes were counted Wednesday. King County, the state’s most populous, was rejecting I-976 but most other counties were approving it.

Sponsored by Tim Eyman, the measure would cap most taxes paid through annual vehicle registration at $30 and largely revoke the authority of state and local governments to add new taxes and fees without voter approval.

The measure would also repeal taxes and fees that were already in place, which could cost the state and local governments more than $4 billion in revenue over the next six years, according to the state Office of Financial Management.

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7:48 a.m.

State and local governments could end up scrambling to pay for road paving and other transportation projects as a Washington measure that would cut car tabs to $30 was passing in early returns Tuesday.

Initiative 976 was being approved after the first votes were tallied in the all mail election. Vote counting will continue for days.

Sponsored by Tim Eyman, the measure would cap most taxes paid through annual vehicle registration at $30 and largely revoke the authority of state and local governments to add new taxes and fees without voter approval.

King County, the state’s most populous, was strongly rejecting I-976 but most other counties were approving it margins.

The measure would also repeal taxes and fees that were already in place, which could cost the state and local governments more than $4 billion in revenue over the next six years.