AP NEWS

Group seeking recreational pot in Oklahoma abandons effort

December 26, 2019 GMT
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo medical marijuana dispensary owner Chance Gilbert displays some of the marijuana he's grown at the Oklahoma Roots dispensary in the bedroom community of Shawnee, about 40 miles east of Oklahoma City. A group seeking a public vote on whether to legalize recreational use of marijuana in Oklahoma has temporarily abandoned their effort. The two proponents of the initiative petition _ Amy Young and Vanessa Avery _ notified the Secretary of State's office on Monday, Dec. 23, 2019 that they were withdrawing the petition they filed earlier this month. Young said in a statement she grew concerned about the impact that recreational marijuana might have on existing medical marijuana businesses and on children who are currently able to receive medicinal marijuana. (AP Photo/Sean Murphy, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo medical marijuana dispensary owner Chance Gilbert displays some of the marijuana he's grown at the Oklahoma Roots dispensary in the bedroom community of Shawnee, about 40 miles east of Oklahoma City. A group seeking a public vote on whether to legalize recreational use of marijuana in Oklahoma has temporarily abandoned their effort. The two proponents of the initiative petition _ Amy Young and Vanessa Avery _ notified the Secretary of State's office on Monday, Dec. 23, 2019 that they were withdrawing the petition they filed earlier this month. Young said in a statement she grew concerned about the impact that recreational marijuana might have on existing medical marijuana businesses and on children who are currently able to receive medicinal marijuana. (AP Photo/Sean Murphy, File)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A group seeking a public vote on whether to legalize recreational use of marijuana in Oklahoma has temporarily abandoned its effort.

The two proponents of the initiative petition — Amy Young and Vanessa Avery — notified the Secretary of State’s office on Monday that they were withdrawing the petition they filed earlier this month.

Young said in a statement she grew concerned about the impact that recreational marijuana might have on existing medical marijuana businesses and on children who are currently able to receive medicinal marijuana.

A spokeswoman for the group, Michelle Tilley, says they plan to rewrite the petition to include greater protections for the medical marijuana industry and submit it again.

If passed, it would amend the Oklahoma Constitution to allow adult use of marijuana and impose a 15% tax on the sale of marijuana, in addition to state and local taxes.

Oklahoma’s medical marijuana program launched last year and has been wildly successful, with more than 220,000 patient and 1,500 dispensary licenses issued so far.