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The Latest: Polis confident of full-day kindergarten funding

January 30, 2019

DENVER (AP) — The Latest on Gov. Jared Polis’ presentation on offering full-day kindergarten in Colorado schools (all times local):

9:05 a.m.

Gov. Jared Polis says he’s confident the state can ensure full-day kindergarten funding in the years ahead.

Polis told the Joint Education Committee on Wednesday that saving reserve funds for schools, higher local property taxes and dedicated work by legislators will ensure that instituting full-day funding won’t be a temporary experiment.

Polis has called for $227 million plus $25 million to fund full-day kindergarten this fall. He said he hoped lawmakers will move quickly to secure that funding in the budget that will take effect July 1.

Polis, who’s founded charter schools for disadvantaged students, says early education provides an essential head start for students and, in the long term, a stronger economy.

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8:30 a.m.

Gov. Jared Polis is appearing before lawmakers to provide details on his plan to offer full-day kindergarten in Colorado schools.

Polis is making his case before the Joint Education Committee at the Capitol Wednesday morning.

Colorado currently pays for half-day kindergarten.

Polis, who’s founded charter schools for disadvantaged students, says early education provides an essential head start for students and, in the long term, a stronger economy.

He’s asked for $227 million for full-day kindergarten to start this fall. Funds for that and $25 million in implementation costs would come from surplus tax revenue lawmakers have to work with this session.

Minority Republicans worry about funding roads and paying down a multimillion-dollar state debt to public schools.

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7:15 a.m.

Gov. Jared Polis is appearing before lawmakers to provide details on his plan to offer full-day kindergarten in Colorado schools.

Polis was appearing early Wednesday before the Joint Education Committee at the Capitol.

Colorado currently pays for half-day kindergarten.

Polis, who’s founded charter schools for disadvantaged students, insists early education provides an essential head start for students and, in the long term, a stronger economy.

He’s asked for $227 million for full-day kindergarten to start this fall. Funds for that and $25 million in implementation costs would come from surplus tax revenue lawmakers have to work with this session.

Minority Republicans worry about funding roads and paying down a multimillion-dollar state debt to public schools.