ADVERTISEMENT
Related topics

FBI Says Suspect Operated Neo-Nazi Training Camp

April 9, 1985 GMT

BOISE, Idaho (AP) _ An alleged official of a neo-Nazi group used money from a $3.5 million California armored car robery to set up a training camp for the group in northern Idaho, the FBI says in court papers.

Ardie McBrearty, 57, of Gentry, Ark., was arrested Thursday on an Idaho warrant charging him with receiving loot from the July 18 holdup in Ukiah, Calif., which the FBI says was carried out by a white-supremacist group known as The Order.

U.S. Magistrate Ned Stewart in Fort Smith, Ark., on Monday ordered McBrearty held without bond until his transfer, probably within 10 days, to face federal charges in Idaho.

ADVERTISEMENT

″We’re not talking about tax evasion here,″ Stewart said. ″We’re talking about robbery. We’re talking about murder.″

U.S. Attorney Asa Hutchinson said federal officials in California are considering additional charges against McBrearty.

In an affidavit filed March 20 in U.S. District Court here, the FBI said McBrearty received $100,000 from Order founder Robert Mathews to help Randall Rader set up a camp north of Priest River to train recruits for the violent offshoot of the Church of Jesus Christ-Christian, or Aryan Nations.

Mathews died in December during a standoff with authorities in a cabin on Whidbey Island, Wash.

In the affidavit, which was sealed until Monday, the FBI alleged that Priest River real estate agent John Muzidal reported selling two plots of land Sept. 1 to men later identified as Rader and McBrearty, who used the name Amos Able.McBrearty paid $30,500 cash, in $100 and $50 bills, as down payment for the 80- and 30-acre parcels, then asked that the land be registered as the Timberline Hunting Club, the affidavit said.

Confidential sources, some or all of whom were members of The Order and participants in some phase of the Ukiah robbery, told the FBI the training camp operated until late in 1984, when bad weather forced its closure.

McBrearty, also known as ″The Professor,″ and Rader, known as ″Big Boy,″ were former members of the Covenant Sword and Arm of the Lord, located near the Arkansas-Missouri border, the FBI affidavit said.

Rader, 33, of Ione, Wash., was arrested March 1 in Spokane, Wash., and charged with harboring a fugitive and receiving money from the Ukiah robbery.

A search-warrant affidavit in Los Angeles said Rader helped hide Gary Lee Yarbrough in northern Idaho before Yarbrough’s November arrest in Portland, Ore. Yarbrough was sentenced to 25 years in prison on weapons violations.

The FBI also alleges McBrearty and another man, Richard Scutari or ″Mr. Black,″ acted as internal security officers for The Order, conducting voice stress tests of members and new recruits to weed out possible informants.

Another alleged member of The Order, David Lane, remained in custody in North Carolina on Monday awaiting transfer to Idaho to face charges including receipt of $10,000 from the Ukiah robbery, counterfeiting, conspiracy and interfering with interstate commerce.

Lane, 46, was arrested March 30 in Winston-Salem, N.C., on a counterfeiting warrant from Philadelphia. He also was wanted for questioning in last June’s slaying of Alan Berg, an outspoken Jewish radio-talk show host in Denver, officials have said.

A separate FBI affidavit released in U.S. District Court on Monday detailed charges against Lane, who was identified as one of the original members of The Order at its founding in October and November 1983.

Lane, also known as ″Lone Wolf,″ allegedly operated a telephone message center in Boise for members of the group, using the name G&S Marketing. It also was established with funds from the Ukiah robbery and was managed by Lane until last August, when he ″disappeared as a result of his participation in the murder of Alan Berg″ and efforts by Denver police to contact him for questioning in the case, the affidavit said.

It said Lane on Dec. 1, 1983, conspired with Yarbrough and others to counterfeit $50 bills north of Hayden Lake, and between March 6, 1984, and May 20, 1984, to counterfeit $10 bills in Boise.