AP NEWS

Ricky Rockets has not abandoned Kankakee

April 6, 2018 GMT

The rumors regarding the demise of the Ricky Rockets Fuel Center are not true and Kankakee’s engineer said construction of the estimated $10 million complex along East Court Street at the Interstate 57 interchange could begin in May or June.

Engineer Neil Piggush said the Hoffman Estates-based company is waiting for issues with the Illinois Department of Transportation to be rectified before construction restarts.

Contractors for the company began working at the site in the early fall last year. Work concluded there near the end of October and company officials anticipated construction to restart in late March.

However, issues between IDOT, the developer and Kankakee still are being discussed, but none are matters Piggush would consider anything close to deal-breakers.

Some construction materials were delivered to the site a few weeks ago.

The two chief issues were construction of a new access point immediately off of Eastridge Drive, as well as an extension to connect motorists with Eastgate Parkway.

The issue with the roads in this area revolve around the highway interchange. The interchange is in the early stages of redevelopment with IDOT. The city has been pushing for reconstruction and if that eventually takes place, portions of Eastgate Parkway, as it currently exists along the eastern side of I-57, will be eliminated to make room for an expanded or shifted interchange.

The I-57 interchange at East Court was constructed in 1965. Costs for reconstruction have been estimated to be in the $40-million range.

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After two years of planning, the winner of the April 2016 Enterprise U business plan competition in Kankakee County has opened Wellistics Infrared Sauna Studio, 190 S. Locust St., Manteno.

Peter Raudulovic, 53, of Bourbonnais, opened the three-room, 1,200-square-foot business this week.

“It’s been a long journey,” the retired Illinois State Police officer said. “I was always confident it would happen. This has been my passion. We stayed the course.”

Also a part-time business instructor at Olivet Nazarene University, Raudulovic explained that infrared light therapy has the ability to penetrate human tissue with radiant heat, which elevates the body’s temperature.

Basically, the body’s elevated temperature allows it to sweat out impurities.

Sauna therapies are used for detoxification, pain relief, weight loss, wound healing, lower blood pressure, improve circulation and relaxation/stress relief.

Depending on therapy sought, sessions range from 30 to 45 minutes.

The sauna suites can be used by one person, but two suites also can accommodate two to three. The third can accommodate up to five.

Users are encouraged to wear lightweight shorts and T-shirt. “Birthday suits” are acceptable as well. The more skin exposed, the better, as that allows for more infrared absorption.

Infrared heat is completely safe and healthy for all living things. Raudulovic said although infrared light is a naturally occurring wavelength of the sun, it does not contain harmful UV rays associated with unprotected sunlight.

Infrared light is used in hospitals to warm newborn infants.

But how does infrared light aid in weight loss? Well, Raudulovic said, sweat released through the pores along with sweat during an average 30 to 45 minute infrared session.

Cost for an individual session is $39. Membership are being offered at $59 per month, which includes four sauna sessions.

The business offers discounted rates for retired or active police, fire and military members. Six sessions per month are $49.

The location is opened from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

For more information or to schedule a session, visit www.wellistics.com or 815-907-7548.