BERLIN (AP) — The estate of the Germanwings co-pilot believed to have intentionally crashed a passenger plane into the Alps in March has been declared bankrupt.

Attorney Joachim Glaeser said Friday that he filed for bankruptcy on behalf of the estate this week in Montabaur, co-pilot Andreas Lubitz's hometown.

Glaeser said the filing was necessary because the estate's debts are expected to exceed its worth, and because no heirs came forward. Anyone who had come forward to inherit his property would also have had to take on any debts from possible claims on the estate.

Glaeser wouldn't say how much Lubitz's estate is worth.

Prosecutors believe Lubitz intentionally crashed the Airbus A320 into a French mountain on March 24, killing all 150 people on board.