AP NEWS
Click to copy
Click to copy

Kim Kardashian West will cover released prisoner’s rent

March 12, 2019
1 of 2
FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2019 file photo, Matthew Charles joins a news conference at the Cordell Hull building in Nashville advocating for Tennessee legislation to make it easier for some felons to get their voting rights restored. Thanks to Kim Kardashian West, Charles, who was one of the first inmates to be released under a new federal sentencing reform law, says he won’t have to worry about covering rent for the next five years. Charles told The Tennessean last week he hadn’t been able to find permanent housing since his Jan. 3 release, in part due to his criminal history. But on Sunday, March 10 Charles said Kardashian West had decided to step in. She’s among celebrities who have advocated for criminal justice reform. (AP Photo/Jonathan Mattise, File)
1 of 2
FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2019 file photo, Matthew Charles joins a news conference at the Cordell Hull building in Nashville advocating for Tennessee legislation to make it easier for some felons to get their voting rights restored. Thanks to Kim Kardashian West, Charles, who was one of the first inmates to be released under a new federal sentencing reform law, says he won’t have to worry about covering rent for the next five years. Charles told The Tennessean last week he hadn’t been able to find permanent housing since his Jan. 3 release, in part due to his criminal history. But on Sunday, March 10 Charles said Kardashian West had decided to step in. She’s among celebrities who have advocated for criminal justice reform. (AP Photo/Jonathan Mattise, File)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Thanks to Kim Kardashian West, one of the first inmates released after federal sentencing reforms won’t have to worry about rent for five years.

Matthew Charles told The Tennessean last week that he couldn’t find permanent housing since his Jan. 3 release, in part due to his criminal history. But on Sunday, Charles announced that Kardashian West, an advocate for criminal justice reform, will be helping him out. He said she’s not doing it to get attention, but he just had to share it.

Convicted of a nonviolent drug offense in 1996, Charles received national attention because he was ordered back to prison in 2018, two years after his sentence was ruled unfair. He attended this year’s State of the Union address at President Donald Trump’s invitation.

___

Information from: The Tennessean, http://www.tennessean.com

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.