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61-year-old serves as surrogate mother for son, his husband

April 1, 2019 GMT

              In this March 25, 2019 photo, Matthew Eledge, left, his mother Cecile Eledge, center, and Matthew's husband Elliot Dougherty, right, greet baby Uma after her delivery at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb. Cecile Eledge volunteered to be the surrogate mother to her grandchild, conceived with sperm from Matthew Eledge and an egg from Dougherty's sister, Lea Yribe. (Ariel Panowicz via AP)
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In this March 25, 2019 photo, Matthew Eledge, left, his mother Cecile Eledge, center, and Matthew's husband Elliot Dougherty, right, greet baby Uma after her delivery at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb. Cecile Eledge volunteered to be the surrogate mother to her grandchild, conceived with sperm from Matthew Eledge and an egg from Dougherty's sister, Lea Yribe. (Ariel Panowicz via AP)
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In this March 25, 2019 photo, Matthew Eledge, left, his mother Cecile Eledge, center, and Matthew's husband Elliot Dougherty, right, greet baby Uma after her delivery at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb. Cecile Eledge volunteered to be the surrogate mother to her grandchild, conceived with sperm from Matthew Eledge and an egg from Dougherty's sister, Lea Yribe. (Ariel Panowicz via AP)

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A 61-year-old Nebraska woman who served as a surrogate mother for her son and his husband has given birth to a baby girl.

Matthew Eledge and Elliot Dougherty were talking about becoming parents when Eledge’s mother and Dougherty’s sister offered to help.

Cecile Eledge was 60 at the time and had gone through menopause, but she was approved as a surrogate after extensive screening. Dougherty’s sister was the egg donor, and after doctors used Eledge’s sperm to fertilize the egg, the embryo was implanted.

Cecile Eledge gave birth last week at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The family says they’ve received nothing but support.

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Dr. Ramzy Nakad is a maternal-fetal medicine specialist who worked with the family. Nakad tells the Omaha World-Herald that doctors keep older expectant mothers under heightened surveillance, and in this case, “everything was aligned for a good outcome.”

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Information from: Omaha World-Herald, http://www.omaha.com