BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Latest on the Dakota Access oil pipeline (all times local):

2:10 p.m.

Authorities in a second state have confirmed an incident of vandalism against the Dakota Access pipeline.

Mahaska County Sheriff Russell Van Renterghem in Iowa says it appears someone used a torch to cut a hole in the empty pipeline at an above-ground safety valve site southeast of Des Moines. He says it appears the culprit maneuvered under a fence around the facility.

The incident was discovered March 13. A similar incident was discovered Friday in southeastern South Dakota.

Pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners said in court documents Monday that there have been "coordinated physical attacks" along the $3.8 billion pipeline that will carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois, but company officials didn't provide further details.

State officials in North Dakota and Illinois say they aren't immediately aware of any incidents in their states.

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11:30 a.m.

Authorities have confirmed an incident of vandalism against the Dakota Access oil pipeline in South Dakota.

Pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners said in court documents Monday that there have been "coordinated physical attacks" along the $3.8 billion pipeline that will carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois, but company officials didn't provide further details.

The South Dakota attorney general's office confirmed one incident of what it called "felony vandalism" southeast of Sioux Falls.

Lincoln County Sheriff's Deputy Chad Brown says someone burned a hole in the pipe at an above-ground valve site Friday. He says the site had no fencing or other security.

No injuries were reported. Brown says no suspects were immediately identified. Local and state officials are investigating and have notified the FBI.

ETP plans to have oil flowing this week.

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8:45 a.m.

Officials are restoring normal traffic on a stretch of North Dakota highway that was closed for months due to protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Part of state Highway 1806 was shut down in late October after a bridge was damaged by fires during protests.

Late last week, authorities began allowing traffic with the assistance of pilot cars escorting vehicles over the 9-mile stretch near the site where pipeline opponents camped for months. The camps were cleared out and shut down late last month in advance of spring flooding season.

Morton County sheriff's spokesman Rob Keller says the highway is being fully reopened, without pilot cars, at noon Tuesday.

The $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline is getting ready to move North Dakota oil to Illinois.

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8:15 a.m.

Environmental activists who tried to disrupt some oil pipeline operations in four states to protest the Dakota Access pipeline say they aren't responsible for any recent attacks on that pipeline.

Dakota Access developer Energy Transfer Partners said in court documents Monday that there have been "coordinated physical attacks" along the $3.8 billion pipeline that will carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois. Company officials haven't responded to AP requests for more details.

Jay O'Hara with the Climate Disobedience Center told The Associated Press Tuesday that Climate Direct Action wasn't involved, and he isn't aware of anyone claiming responsibility.

In October, Climate Direct Action activists tried to shut valves on oil pipelines in North Dakota, Minnesota, Montana and Washington. But O'Hara says the group has no plans to target Dakota Access.