AP NEWS

New Mexico adopts SAT as requirement for high school juniors

October 19, 2019 GMT
FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2019, file photo, New Mexico Public Education Secretary Ryan Stewart speaks about the challenges at the state's public schools during an interview in his office in Santa Fe, N.M. Stewart announced Friday, Oct. 18, 2019, the SAT will become the official statewide standardized test for high school juniors. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2019, file photo, New Mexico Public Education Secretary Ryan Stewart speaks about the challenges at the state's public schools during an interview in his office in Santa Fe, N.M. Stewart announced Friday, Oct. 18, 2019, the SAT will become the official statewide standardized test for high school juniors. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee, File)

ALUBQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The SAT will become New Mexico’s official statewide standardized test for high school juniors this spring, a state official said Friday.

All juniors will be required to take the SAT — an exam administered by the non-profit organization College Board.

Public Education Secretary Ryan Stewart said the exam is aligned with the state’s academic standards, and all New Mexico colleges and universities accept it.

“In administering the SAT, we are paying for students’ college entrance exams for the first time ever, effectively removing one major barrier to college entrance for thousands of New Mexico students,” Stewart said in a statement.

The move came after a task force convened by New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said any new assessment should have meaning beyond high school.

Lujan Grisham called for the task force after announcing days into her term that her administration was scrapping student assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers.

The state Public Education Department is expected next week to announce new statewide standardized exams for students in grades 3 to 8. The agency also will unveil new tests for other high school students.

In July, the state released results that showed around 80% of students weren’t proficient in math and 67% weren’t proficient in reading. The results were from a “transition test” administered in the spring.