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Lots of great writing, and suddenly 2 less great writers

March 12, 2019
FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2009, file photo, sports writer Dan Jenkins, right, stands next to his daughter, Sally Jenkins, at the PGA Championship at Hazeltine National Golf Club in Chaska, Minn. Jenkins, the sports writing great and best-selling author known for his humor, has died. He was 89. TCU athletic director Jeremiah Donati confirmed Jenkins died Thursday, March 7, 2019, in his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2009, file photo, sports writer Dan Jenkins, right, stands next to his daughter, Sally Jenkins, at the PGA Championship at Hazeltine National Golf Club in Chaska, Minn. Jenkins, the sports writing great and best-selling author known for his humor, has died. He was 89. TCU athletic director Jeremiah Donati confirmed Jenkins died Thursday, March 7, 2019, in his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

With the recent passing of two of the greatest sports writers of our time, co-hosts Jim Litke and Tim Dahlberg take a look at how athletes are covered in the era of instant news and how Dan Jenkins and Hugh McIlvanney gave us the kind of insight that is increasingly hard to find these days.

The PodcastOne Sports Now hosts play part of an interview they conducted with Jenkins at the Masters last year, and discuss his sense of humor and willingness to go places other writers don’t dare tread. They also discuss their favorite writers today, with Jenkins’ daughter, Sally, a columnist at the Washington Post, making the short list.

Dahlberg talks about hanging with McIlvanney at some of the biggest fights, and how when he started writing about boxing feared his career would be short because he would never be as good of a writer as the Scotsman.

The AP’s Barry Wilner joins the show to talk NFL free agency, and there is discussion about the worst owners in sports and the lawsuit by members of the U.S. national women’s team seeking gender equity on the eve of the women’s World Cup.

Instead of food, the hosts compare whiskeys and how the best are still made in Ireland and Scotland.

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