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The Latest: Hong Kong activist angry over decision on law

June 10, 2019
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Protesters rallying against the proposed amendments to extradition law at the Legislative Council, react with police officers in Hong Kong during the early hours of Monday, June 10, 2019. The extradition law has aroused concerns that this legislation would undermine the city's independent judicial system as it allows Hong Kong to hand over fugitives to the jurisdictions that the city doesn't currently have an extradition agreement with, including mainland China, where a fair trial might not be guaranteed. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on a protest in Hong Kong against amendments to its extradition laws (all times local):

6:45 p.m.

Prominent Hong Kong activist Agnes Chow has expressed anger over a decision by the territory’s leader to move forward with a controversial extradition bill.

Speaking to journalists in Tokyo on Monday, Chow said Chief Executive Carrie Lam “ignored the anger of more than a million Hong Kong citizens.”

She added: “Not only me, but I believe most of the Hong Kong people, have felt really angry with Carrie Lam’s response to our rally.”

Chow is among a group of young activists leading the opposition against proposed amendments to Hong Kong’s extradition law. The changes would allow people in Hong Kong to be sent to mainland China to face criminal charges.

Hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets Sunday to express their dissatisfaction with the bill, which critics say would put Hong Kong residents at risk of falling into the hands of China’s unforgiving judicial system.

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5:30 p.m.

China says it supports an extradition bill that has sparked massive protests in Hong Kong.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Monday that China firmly backs the proposed amendments and opposes “the wrong words and deeds of any external forces” that interfere in Hong Kong’s affairs.

The legislation would allow suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China to face charges.

Opponents say the bill would make Hong Kong residents vulnerable to murky charges and unfair trials in mainland China, while also eroding Hong Kong’s judicial independence.

Hundreds of thousands of people marched through central Hong Kong on Sunday in what may have been the territory’s largest protest in recent memory.

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Noon

Hong Kong’s leader has signaled that her government will go ahead with proposed amendments to its extradition laws after a massive protest against them.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam told the media Monday that the legislation is important and will help Hong Kong uphold justice and fulfill its international obligations.

She said safeguards will be added to the legislation to ensure human rights are protected.

Hundreds of thousands of people marched through central Hong Kong on Sunday in what may have been the territory’s largest protest in recent memory.

The amendments would allow Hong Kong to extradite people to mainland China to face charges. Opponents say defendants in the Chinese judicial system won’t have the same rights as in Hong Kong.

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