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AP Photo Gallery: Atlanta Student Movement of 1960

March 8, 2020 GMT
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FILE - In this 1960 file photo, Martin Luther King Jr. speaks in Atlanta. The civil rights leader had carried the banner for the causes of social justice — organizing protests, leading marches and making powerful speeches exposing the scourges of segregation, poverty and racism. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings. (AP Photo, File)
1 of 11
FILE - In this 1960 file photo, Martin Luther King Jr. speaks in Atlanta. The civil rights leader had carried the banner for the causes of social justice — organizing protests, leading marches and making powerful speeches exposing the scourges of segregation, poverty and racism. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings. (AP Photo, File)

ATLANTA (AP) — Following the publication of “An Appeal for Human Rights” on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta’s historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregationist laws that excluded them from white areas in restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings. Hundreds of black people were arrested that year, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., before white leaders relented and desegregated Atlanta’s facilities. Here is a selection of Associated Press photos showing events related to the Atlanta Student Movement against racial inequality and exclusion.