AP NEWS
Press release content from NewMediaWire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.
PRESS RELEASE: Paid content from NewMediaWire
Press release content from NewMediaWire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

Weight-reduction surgery may prevent strokes, lengthen lives

November 11, 2019
1 of 2
Clot in brain illustration
1 of 2
Clot in brain illustration

Obese people who undergo weight-reduction surgery live longer than obese people who do not have surgery, according to new research.

Those who have weight-loss surgery are also less likely to have a clot-related stroke than those who don’t have surgery.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT/5 a.m. ET Monday, Nov. 11, 2019

( NewMediaWire ) - November 11, 2019 - DALLAS - Obese patients who undergo weight-reduction surgery live longer and are less likely to experience a clot-caused stroke than those who do not, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16-18 in Philadelphia. The Association’s Scientific Sessions is an annual, premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

“Obesity is associated with a number of risk factors for heart disease and we know that bariatric surgery — which alters the digestive system to induce weight loss — can help reduce these risk factors and improve their control. In this study, we examined if bariatric surgery helps reduce stroke risk,” said Maddalena Ardissino, M.B.B.S., B.Sc., co-lead author of the study and academic foundation doctor at the Imperial College London in the United Kingdom.

In the largest and longest study of bariatric surgery to-date, researchers analyzed the health care records of more than 4,200 patients in the United Kingdom who had bariatric surgery and compared them to an equal number of people who did not have bariatric surgery, matched by age, gender and weight-for-height. At the time of the surgery, none of the participants had previously had a stroke. The records were part of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a large ongoing initiative that contains anonymous coded primary and some secondary health care data on more than 7% of all patients in the country.

During an average follow-up of 11 years and after adjusting for all major risk factors and medication use, researchers found:

73 of the participants had a brain bleed, clot-caused stroke or mini-stroke;

229 patients died from any cause;

Those who received bariatric surgery were 69% less likely to experience a clot-caused stroke;

Rates of brain bleeds were not reduced by weight loss surgery; and

Those who underwent bariatric surgery were 68% less likely to die during the follow-up period than those who did not have surgery.

“These findings call for increased awareness and implementation of bariatric surgery as a treatment step for obese patients who are unable to achieve adequate weight loss through lifestyle and medication therapy,” said Ardissino. “Currently, only a small fraction of people with obesity receive bariatric surgery.”

A shift in the perception of bariatric surgery is needed. Bariatric surgery used to be seen as an aesthetic procedure undergone by only a minority of the eligible population. Considering the quickly emerging evidence on its long-term benefits, the surgery must be viewed as a potentially death-preventing and standard-of-care procedure that should be discussed with all eligible patients, Ardissino concluded.

This study can only show an association and cannot prove cause-and-effect. Although the data was from the United Kingdom, researchers say the results should apply to other western countries with similar populations.

Co-authors are Osama Moussa, B.Sc., B.M.B.Ch., M.R.C.S., P.G.Dip.; Tobias Heaton, B.Sc.; Alice Tang, M.B.B.S., B.Sc.; Paul Ziprin, M.B.B.Ch., F.R.C.S.; Ara Darzi F.R.S., FMedSci., FREng., M.D.; Omar Khan, M.A., M.B.B.Chir., Ph.D., P.G.C.E., P.G.Dip.; Peter Collins M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P., F.A.C.C., F.E.S.C.; and Sanjay Purkayastha M.B.B.S., B.Sc., M.D., F.R.C.S. Author disclosures are in the abstract.

Additional Resources:

Downloadable multimedia available on the right column of the release link  https://newsroom.heart.org/news/weight-reduction-surgery-may-prevent-strokes-lengthen-lives?preview=2d8dde72def12d1b3c193633ea4015da

Bariatric surgery may reduce heart failure risk

Bariatric surgery for severely obese teens may help prevent premature heart disease

For more news at AHA Scientific Sessions 2019, follow us on Twitter @HeartNews   #AHA19.

Statements and conclusions of study authors presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the Association’s policy or position. The Association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The Association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific Association programs and events. The Association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at  https://www.heart.org/en/about-us/aha-financial-information.

The American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions is a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. Scientific Sessions 2019 is November 16-18 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia. More than 12,000 leading physicians, scientists, cardiologists and allied health care professionals from around the world convene at the Scientific Sessions to participate in basic, clinical and population science presentations, discussions and curricula that can shape the future of cardiovascular science and medicine, including prevention and quality improvement. During the three-day meeting, attendees receive exclusive access to over 4,100 original research presentations and can earn Continuing Medical Education (CME), Continuing Education (CE) or Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credits for educational sessions. Engage in the Scientific Sessions conversation on social media via #AHA19.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives. We are dedicated to ensuring equitable health in all communities. Through collaboration with numerous organizations, and powered by millions of volunteers, we fund innovative research, advocate for the public’s health and share lifesaving resources. The Dallas-based organization has been a leading source of health information for nearly a century. Connect with us on heart.org, Facebook, Twitter or by calling 1-800-AHA-USA1.

###

For Media Inquiries and AHA Volunteer Expert Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 16-18, 2019 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia: 215-418-2450

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org