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Press release content from NewMediaWire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

Evening eating linked to poorer heart health for women

November 11, 2019 GMT
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weight check - woman (H)
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weight check - woman (H)

Research Highlights: Women who consumed a higher proportion of their daily intake of calories later in the evening were more likely to be at greater risk for cardiovascular disease than women who did not.Every 1% increase in calories consumed in the evening increased the likelihood of higher blood pressure and body mass index and poorer long-term control of blood sugar.Embargoed until time 4 a.m. CT/5 a.m. ET Monday, Nov. 11, 2019( ) - November 11, 2019 - DALLAS - Women who consumed a higher proportion of their daily calories later in the evening were more likely to be at greater risk for than women who did not, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16-18 in Philadelphia. The Association’s Scientific Sessions is an annual, premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.Researchers assessed the cardiovascular health of 112 women (average age 33, 44% Hispanic) using the American Heart Association’s measures at the beginning of the study and one year later. Life’s Simple 7 represents the risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular health and include not smoking, being physically active, eating healthy foods and controlling body weight, along with measuring cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels. A heart health score based on meeting the Life’s Simple 7 was computed.Study participants kept electronic food diaries by computer or cell phone to report what, how much and when they ate for one week at the beginning of the study and for one week 12 months later. Data from the food diary completed by each woman was used to determine the relationship between heart health and the timing of when they ate. Researchers found:“So far, lifestyle approaches to prevent heart disease have focused on what we eat and how much we eat,” said lead study author Nour Makarem, Ph.D., an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. “These preliminary results indicate that intentional eating that is mindful of the timing and proportion of calories in evening meals may represent a simple, modifiable behavior that can help lower heart disease risk.”The results should be confirmed in a larger sample and in other populations, said Makarem who is a member of the American Heart Association’s Council on Epidemiology and Prevention Early Career Committee.The American Heart Association funded the study through its .Kristin Newby, M.D., chair of the oversight advisory committee for the Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network, said this type of research is important to help women of all ages better understand and manage their health risks.“I think it’s an important study, it’s foundational more than definitive at this point, but I think it provides some really interesting insights into an aspect of nutrition and how it relates to cardiovascular risk factors that we really haven’t thought about before,” said Newby, professor of medicine and cardiology at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “It is never too early to start thinking about your heart health whether you’re 20 or 30 or 40 or moving into the 60s and 70s. If you’re healthy now or if you have heart disease, you can always do more. That goes along with being heart smart and heart healthy.”Co-authors are Dorothy D. Sears, Ph.D.; Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Ph.D., F.A.H.A., C.C.S.H.; Sheila F. Castaneda, Ph.D.; Linda C. Gallo, Ph.D.; Gregory A. Talavera, M.D., M.P.H.; Ming Liao, M.S.; Stephanie S. Byun, M.S.; Zara Mayat, M.S.; Faris Zuraikat, Ph.D.; and Brooke Aggarwal, Ed.D., M.S., F.A.H.A. Author disclosures are in the abstract.Additional Resources:Downloadable multimedia available on the right column of the release link  Link to release in   For more news at AHA Scientific Sessions 2019, follow us on Twitter   #AHA19.Statements and conclusions of study authors presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the Association’s policy or position. The Association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The Association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific Association programs and events. The Association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at  .The American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions is a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. Scientific Sessions 2019 is November 16-18 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia. More than 12,000 leading physicians, scientists, cardiologists and allied health care professionals from around the world convene at the Scientific Sessions to participate in basic, clinical and population science presentations, discussions and curricula that can shape the future of cardiovascular science and medicine, including prevention and quality improvement. During the three-day meeting, attendees receive exclusive access to over 4,100 original research presentations and can earn Continuing Medical Education (CME), Continuing Education (CE) or Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credits for educational sessions. Engage in the Scientific Sessions conversation on social media via #AHA19.About the American Heart AssociationThe American Heart Association is a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives. We are dedicated to ensuring equitable health in all communities. Through collaboration with numerous organizations, and powered by millions of volunteers, we fund innovative research, advocate for the public’s health and share lifesaving resources. The Dallas-based organization has been a leading source of health information for nearly a century. Connect with us on , , or by calling 1-800-AHA-USA1.###For Media Inquiries and AHA Volunteer Expert Perspective:AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173AHA News Media Office, Nov. 16-18, 2019 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia: 215-418-2450For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)and