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Pope Beatifies 10 More

March 8, 1999

VATICAN CITY (AP) _ Pope John Paul II, already responsible for more than half of the beatifications performed in the last 400 years, added 10 more people to the church’s list of potential saints on Sunday.

Of the 1,611 faithful beatified since 1605, when the Vatican codified the church’s last formal step before sainthood, 819 of them have been accorded the honor by this pope, whose papacy began in 1978. John Paul has also named 276 saints.

Of the 10 names added to the church’s roll call of the blessed, eight of them were men who died for their faith during the Spanish civil war.

Beatification, though, is not a guarantee of sainthood. While one miracle is required to be beatified, a second one is needed for a person to be named a saint, unless the person was a martyr.

There is no timetable for the process, and many of those beatified never become saints.

The latest additions included a 17th-century Frenchman, Nicolas Barre, who founded religious orders dedicated to teaching, and an ailing German laywoman, Anna Schaffer, who, before she died in 1925, won fame for giving comfort to the suffering.

Like nine of the 10 beatified Sunday, many of those honored by the pope lived in this century. John Paul has been passionate about singling out men and women of modern times who can serve as role models.

The latest beatifications, made in a more than two-hour-long ceremony of prayer and readings in various languages led by the pope in St. Peter’s Basilica, raised to 221 the number of beatified who gave their lives during Spain’s civil war.

Eight of those beatified Sunday had served as missionaries around the world and were killed in the southern Spanish town of Motril in the summer of 1936 and are considered martyrs.

Seven of them were members of the Agostinian order and the eighth was serving as a diocesan priest. The eight were Vincente Soler, Deogratias Palacios, Leone Inchausti, Jose Rada, Juliano Moreno, Jose Riccardo Diez, Vincente Pinilla and Manuel Martin Sierra.

Schaffer dedicated herself to God when she first received Communion at age 12. A fall into a vat of lye when she was 19 left her an invalid, and many others who suffered turned to her for advice and comfort.

Fifteen years before her death, her body manifested the stigmata, the five wounds on limbs and side similar to those suffered by Jesus during crucifixion.