AP NEWS

Board to consider new conditions for medical marijuana use

December 25, 2019 GMT
In this Sept. 20, 2018, photo, an employee at a medical marijuana cultivator works on topping a marijuana plant in Eastlake, Ohio. The Ohio Medical Board is accepting new petitions through the end of the year from those seeking to add illnesses as qualifying conditions for physicians to recommend medical marijuana to patients. (AP Photo/David Dermer, File)
In this Sept. 20, 2018, photo, an employee at a medical marijuana cultivator works on topping a marijuana plant in Eastlake, Ohio. The Ohio Medical Board is accepting new petitions through the end of the year from those seeking to add illnesses as qualifying conditions for physicians to recommend medical marijuana to patients. (AP Photo/David Dermer, File)

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The state Medical Board is accepting new petitions through the end of the year from those seeking to add illnesses as qualifying conditions for physicians to recommend medical marijuana to Ohio patients, cleveland.com reported.

Once an illness is added to the list of approved conditions, the board cannot remove it because state law does not give the board authority to do so, according to board spokeswoman Tessie Pollock. Petitions will be reviewed early next year.

AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, are among the 21 current approved illnesses, along with cancer, epilepsy, glaucoma and Parkinson’s disease.

Earlier this year the board rejected petitions seeking to add anxiety and autism spectrum disorders as qualifying conditions.

The board will for the first time open up a public comment period, beginning after its Jan. 8 meeting, said executive director Stephanie Louka. Final decisions on new accepting conditions would come after several months.

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This story was first published on Dec. 25, 2019. It was updated on Dec. 27, 2019, to correct the name of the State Medical Board of Ohio spokeswoman. She is Tessie Pollock, not Tessa Pollock. It was also updated to clarify that the board says state law does not give it the authority to remove conditions from the list of approved conditions for which doctors can recommend medical marijuana to patients.