AP NEWS

Governor signs bill requiring clergy to report child abuse

March 27, 2019

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — In response in part to the child sex abuse scandal in the Catholic Church, Virginia will have a new law on July 1 requiring priests, ministers, rabbis and other clergy members to report suspected cases of child abuse or neglect.

Gov. Ralph Northam has signed into law two bills — HB 1659, sponsored by Del. Karrie Delaney, D-Fairfax, and SB 1257, introduced by Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel, R-Fauquier. The measures mandate that religious officials must report any suspected abuse to local law enforcement.

The bills passed unanimously in the House and Senate last month.

Existing state law lists 18 categories of people who must report information to local authorities if they “have reason to suspect that a child is an abused or neglected child.” They include health-care providers, police officers, athletic coaches and teachers.

The new law will add a 19th category to the list of “mandatory reporters”: “Any minister, priest, rabbi, imam, or duly accredited practitioner of any religious organization or denomination usually referred to as a church.”

However, the law will exempt clergy members from the reporting requirement when confidentiality is required by the religious organization, such as anything a priest hears during confession.

A minister who hears about possible child abuse while counseling a parishioner, for example, would not have to tell authorities.

Delaney said she filed her bill after a church in her Northern Virginia district failed to act on a case of child abuse. She said 27 other states have laws making clergy mandatory reporters.

“Members of the clergy are in a role of trust and authority and they should not be held to a different standard than every other professional whose duty it is to protect children,” Delaney said.

Child abuse by clergy has been a national concern in recent years with disclosures that some Catholic priests had sexually abused children and their superiors had covered up the incidents.

Last month, the Diocese of Richmond released the names of 43 clergy members who “have a credible and substantiated allegation of sexual abuse involving a minor.” The Diocese of Arlington released the names of 16 such individuals.

The Virginia Catholic Conference, which represents the two dioceses on matters of public policy, supported the legislation introduced by Delaney and Vogel.

Grier Weeks, senior executive of the National Association to Protect Children, sees Virginia’s new law as a step toward change but also a reflection of how much work is left to do.

“Any action is great, but you shouldn’t need laws for people to do the right thing — especially when protecting children,” Weeks said.

Weeks warned parents that predators are usually those they trust most around their children, not strangers.

“Predators often seem friendly,” Weeks said. “It is important to stay vigilant.”

Northam signed the legislation just days before the start of National Child Abuse Prevention Month on April 1.

To receive reports of sexual abuse of a minor by clergy, the Virginia State Police have a website, www.virginiaclergyhotline.com, and a toll-free hotline, 833-454-9064. Callers may remain anonymous.

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This story was produced by the Virginia Commonwealth University’s Capital News Service.