Mink, the black bear, found dead in New Hampshire

August 26, 2020 GMT
FILE - In this April 13, 2018, file photo, Andrew Timmins, the bear project leader with the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game, steps over a tranquilized female black bear as Nancy Comeau, right, of the USDA wildlife services, keeps a hand on the bear after it had been moved onto her side in Hanover, N.H. The bear, tagged and fitted with a tracking collar, was later relocated to far northern New Hampshire. But in May 2019, the bear returned to her home turf in Hanover. In spring 2020, the bear is preparing to emerge from hibernation in her den with three new cubs. (Jennifer Hauck/The Valley News via AP, File)
FILE - In this April 13, 2018, file photo, Andrew Timmins, the bear project leader with the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game, steps over a tranquilized female black bear as Nancy Comeau, right, of the USDA wildlife services, keeps a hand on the bear after it had been moved onto her side in Hanover, N.H. The bear, tagged and fitted with a tracking collar, was later relocated to far northern New Hampshire. But in May 2019, the bear returned to her home turf in Hanover. In spring 2020, the bear is preparing to emerge from hibernation in her den with three new cubs. (Jennifer Hauck/The Valley News via AP, File)
FILE - In this April 13, 2018, file photo, Andrew Timmins, the bear project leader with the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game, steps over a tranquilized female black bear as Nancy Comeau, right, of the USDA wildlife services, keeps a hand on the bear after it had been moved onto her side in Hanover, N.H. The bear, tagged and fitted with a tracking collar, was later relocated to far northern New Hampshire. But in May 2019, the bear returned to her home turf in Hanover. In spring 2020, the bear is preparing to emerge from hibernation in her den with three new cubs. (Jennifer Hauck/The Valley News via AP, File)
FILE - In this April 13, 2018, file photo, Andrew Timmins, the bear project leader with the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game, steps over a tranquilized female black bear as Nancy Comeau, right, of the USDA wildlife services, keeps a hand on the bear after it had been moved onto her side in Hanover, N.H. The bear, tagged and fitted with a tracking collar, was later relocated to far northern New Hampshire. But in May 2019, the bear returned to her home turf in Hanover. In spring 2020, the bear is preparing to emerge from hibernation in her den with three new cubs. (Jennifer Hauck/The Valley News via AP, File)
FILE - In this April 13, 2018, file photo, Andrew Timmins, the bear project leader with the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game, steps over a tranquilized female black bear as Nancy Comeau, right, of the USDA wildlife services, keeps a hand on the bear after it had been moved onto her side in Hanover, N.H. The bear, tagged and fitted with a tracking collar, was later relocated to far northern New Hampshire. But in May 2019, the bear returned to her home turf in Hanover. In spring 2020, the bear is preparing to emerge from hibernation in her den with three new cubs. (Jennifer Hauck/The Valley News via AP, File)

LEBANON, N.H. (AP) — A bear that trekked thousands of miles to return to her home turf after she was relocated by order of the governor has died, according to wildlife officials.

Known as “Mink,” the black bear was set to be euthanized along with three of her offspring in 2017 after repeated problems with them feeding from trash and bird feeders culminated with two bears entering a home in Hanover. Republican Gov. Sununu instead ordered them to be moved to far northern New Hampshire, but Mink returned the following year with four new cubs.

In 2018, she was fitted with a tracking collar and moved 120 miles north, but she again returned to Hanover after traveling thousands of miles in a looping route through New Hampshire and Vermont.

After officials noticed no movement for several days, her body was found Tuesday near the Mascoma River in Lebanon, the Valley News reported. She appeared to have a broken foreleg, and given the proximity to Interstate 89, she likely was struck by a vehicle, said Andrew Timmins, who leads the black bear project for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Mink, who was in her teens and weighed over 200 pounds, had three cubs this year. Authorities searched a large area near her home range for them with no luck, Timmins said.

“We’re going to be relying on reports, hoping people get some sightings of them,” Timmins said.

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