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Memoir of civil rights leader C.T. Vivian released

March 21, 2021 GMT
FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2012, file photo, civil rights activist C.T. Vivian sits at his home in Atlanta. This Sunday, March 7, 2021, marks the 56th anniversary of the Selma marches and "Bloody Sunday," when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7, 1965, to demand the right to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge. The March 7, 2021, Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee will be the first without the towering presence of John Lewis, as well as the Rev. Joseph Lowery, Vivian and attorney Bruce Boynton, who all died in 2020. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2012, file photo, civil rights activist C.T. Vivian sits at his home in Atlanta. This Sunday, March 7, 2021, marks the 56th anniversary of the Selma marches and "Bloody Sunday," when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7, 1965, to demand the right to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge. The March 7, 2021, Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee will be the first without the towering presence of John Lewis, as well as the Rev. Joseph Lowery, Vivian and attorney Bruce Boynton, who all died in 2020. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2012, file photo, civil rights activist C.T. Vivian sits at his home in Atlanta. This Sunday, March 7, 2021, marks the 56th anniversary of the Selma marches and "Bloody Sunday," when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7, 1965, to demand the right to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge. The March 7, 2021, Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee will be the first without the towering presence of John Lewis, as well as the Rev. Joseph Lowery, Vivian and attorney Bruce Boynton, who all died in 2020. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama publisher has released the memoir of the late civil rights leader C.T. Vivian of Atlanta months after his death.

The Montgomery-based NewSouth Books said “It’s in the Action: Memories of a Nonviolent Warrior” is now available. Vivian wrote the 224-page book with Steve Fiffer before his death last year.

Vivian began organizing sit-ins against segregation in the 1940s in Illinois and later joined forces with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who rose to prominence while leading the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955 and 1956.

In 1965, Vivian led dozens of marchers to a courthouse in Selma, where he was punched by then-Dallas County Sheriff Jim Clark. News coverage of the assault helped turn a local registration drive into a national issue.

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Vivian died in July at the age of 95. He was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013.

The book includes a forward by former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, who worked with Vivian in the civil rights movement.