Tuskegee band members threaten strike, demand more support

October 26, 2021 GMT
FILE - Members of the Tuskegee University Marching Crimson Piper band perform during the Martin Luther King Jr., Day parade in St. Petersburg, Fla., Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. Members of the Tuskegee University marching band are threatening to quit performing at school events to protest what they say is a lack of resources and support. WSFA-TV reports that concerned members of the Marching Crimson Pipers released a statement Saturday through the Tuskegee Student Government Association complaining about conditions within the program. (Scott Keeler/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
FILE - Members of the Tuskegee University Marching Crimson Piper band perform during the Martin Luther King Jr., Day parade in St. Petersburg, Fla., Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. Members of the Tuskegee University marching band are threatening to quit performing at school events to protest what they say is a lack of resources and support. WSFA-TV reports that concerned members of the Marching Crimson Pipers released a statement Saturday through the Tuskegee Student Government Association complaining about conditions within the program. (Scott Keeler/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
FILE - Members of the Tuskegee University Marching Crimson Piper band perform during the Martin Luther King Jr., Day parade in St. Petersburg, Fla., Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. Members of the Tuskegee University marching band are threatening to quit performing at school events to protest what they say is a lack of resources and support. WSFA-TV reports that concerned members of the Marching Crimson Pipers released a statement Saturday through the Tuskegee Student Government Association complaining about conditions within the program. (Scott Keeler/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
FILE - Members of the Tuskegee University Marching Crimson Piper band perform during the Martin Luther King Jr., Day parade in St. Petersburg, Fla., Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. Members of the Tuskegee University marching band are threatening to quit performing at school events to protest what they say is a lack of resources and support. WSFA-TV reports that concerned members of the Marching Crimson Pipers released a statement Saturday through the Tuskegee Student Government Association complaining about conditions within the program. (Scott Keeler/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
FILE - Members of the Tuskegee University Marching Crimson Piper band perform during the Martin Luther King Jr., Day parade in St. Petersburg, Fla., Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. Members of the Tuskegee University marching band are threatening to quit performing at school events to protest what they say is a lack of resources and support. WSFA-TV reports that concerned members of the Marching Crimson Pipers released a statement Saturday through the Tuskegee Student Government Association complaining about conditions within the program. (Scott Keeler/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

TUSKEGEE, Ala. (AP) — Members of the Tuskegee University marching band are threatening to quit performing at school events to protest what they say is a lack of resources and support.

Concerned members of the Marching Crimson Pipers released a statement Saturday through the Tuskegee Student Government Association complaining about conditions within the program, WSFA-TV reported. It cited a lack of funding that makes traveling performing difficult, a lack of qualified staff and insufficient communication about what’s on with band practices and performances.

“We will no longer allow the inefficient operation of a program that we pour countless hours of energy into. We will no longer allow ourselves to be exploited simply on the basis that we ‘signed up for it.’ And we will no longer allow for the apathetic nature that has been granted to us, as we strive to not only hold our leadership accountable but our fellow band members both current and future,’” said the statement.

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Band representatives met with officials from the historically Black college on Monday, but no resolution was announced.

A statement from Tuskegee President Charlotte Morris called the band an important part of the university family and said the administration looks forward to working with members to respond to their concerns.