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Swimmer Jack’s 2-year ban to be appealed by anti-doping body

December 7, 2020 GMT
FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, April 5, 2018, Australia's gold medal women's 4x100 freestyle relay team member Shayna Jack, poses with her medal at the Aquatic Centre during the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Monday Nov. 16, 2020, Australian swimmer Shayna Jack has been found guilty of accidental doping and was given a two-year ban that expires days before the Tokyo Olympics starts. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, FILE)
FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, April 5, 2018, Australia's gold medal women's 4x100 freestyle relay team member Shayna Jack, poses with her medal at the Aquatic Centre during the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Monday Nov. 16, 2020, Australian swimmer Shayna Jack has been found guilty of accidental doping and was given a two-year ban that expires days before the Tokyo Olympics starts. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, FILE)
FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, April 5, 2018, Australia's gold medal women's 4x100 freestyle relay team member Shayna Jack, poses with her medal at the Aquatic Centre during the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Monday Nov. 16, 2020, Australian swimmer Shayna Jack has been found guilty of accidental doping and was given a two-year ban that expires days before the Tokyo Olympics starts. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, FILE)

SYDNEY (AP) — Swimmer Shayna Jack’s two-year ban for doping will be appealed by Sport Integrity Australia.

SIA chief executive David Sharpe said a statement of appeal was lodged with the Court of Arbitration for Sport on Monday and was based “on the need for clarity in the application of key anti-doping legal principles.”

“Sport Integrity Australia will always act to ensure a level playing field for athletes,” Sharpe said. “In order to protect athletes and sporting competitions, we must have clarity and consistency in the application of the World Anti-Doping Code.”

CAS last month imposed the two-year ban with its judge deciding that Jack didn’t intentionally ingest ligandrol, the banned substance, and considered that she had discharged her onus of proving that the anti-doping rule violation was not intentional.

Jack tested positive for the anabolic agent ahead of the 2019 world championships. An Australian sports tribunal previously recommended a four-year ban before CAS took on the case.

The 22-year-old Jack, a four-time medalist in relays at the 2017 world championships, denied doping and said the positive test was caused by a contaminated supplement. The burden of proof is on athletes in anti-doping cases to show exactly how and when any contamination happened.

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Jack tested positive in an out-of-competition test in June 2019. The freestyle specialist was suspended from the Australian team and sent home from its pre-worlds training camp in Japan.

SIA was established in July, taking over management of the former Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority.

The World Anti-Doping Agency can also still choose to file a case seeking a longer ban.

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