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New Yorker teams with Celadon for book on Jan. 6 report

February 24, 2022 GMT
FILE - Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. Information gathered and posted by a network of online sleuths led to the arrests Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2022, of two men, Matthew Jason Beddingfield and Eric Gerwatowski, charged separately with storming the U.S. Capitol last year, the FBI said in court filings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. Information gathered and posted by a network of online sleuths led to the arrests Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2022, of two men, Matthew Jason Beddingfield and Eric Gerwatowski, charged separately with storming the U.S. Capitol last year, the FBI said in court filings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. Information gathered and posted by a network of online sleuths led to the arrests Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2022, of two men, Matthew Jason Beddingfield and Eric Gerwatowski, charged separately with storming the U.S. Capitol last year, the FBI said in court filings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. Information gathered and posted by a network of online sleuths led to the arrests Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2022, of two men, Matthew Jason Beddingfield and Eric Gerwatowski, charged separately with storming the U.S. Capitol last year, the FBI said in court filings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. Information gathered and posted by a network of online sleuths led to the arrests Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2022, of two men, Matthew Jason Beddingfield and Eric Gerwatowski, charged separately with storming the U.S. Capitol last year, the FBI said in court filings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — The New Yorker is collaborating with a division of Macmillan Publishers on a book edition of the House Select Committee’s planned report on the Jan. 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol a year ago by supporters of then-President Donald Trump.

The committee reportedly hopes to have a final report in the fall.

Government reports are not copyrighted and are generally available for free, though the 9-11 Commission’s study of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election have been the basis for best-selling books.

For the Jan. 6 report, The New Yorker is working with Celadon Books on a paperback and e-book that would come out immediately after the report’s release. New Yorker editor David Remnick will provide an introduction.

“The New Yorker is proud to partner with Celadon Books in presenting and making sense of what promises to be an important historical document, the first comprehensive portrait of the January 6th insurrection at the Capitol,” Remnick said in a statement Thursday.