AP NEWS
ADVERTISEMENT

$20M touch-up for 3 Jersey Shore beaches coming this week

September 28, 2020 GMT
1 of 4
Children play in a hole they dug Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, on a section of beach in Long Branch, N.J., where a replenishment project is due to begin this week. The $20 million project will widen beaches in Long Branch, Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
1 of 4
Children play in a hole they dug Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, on a section of beach in Long Branch, N.J., where a replenishment project is due to begin this week. The $20 million project will widen beaches in Long Branch, Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

LONG BRANCH, N.J. (AP) — Three New Jersey shore beaches in particularly erosion-prone areas will get a $20 million touch-up beginning this week.

Democratic Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. said Monday that the work is needed to address erosion in areas that were hit hard by Superstorm Sandy and that continue to require maintenance.

Work will begin Thursday in Long Branch, Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright, and will add 1 million cubic yards of sand. That’s enough to cover five football fields with a 100-foot-high pile of sand.

“These additional replenishment projects are critical to our beaches and communities along the Jersey Shore,” Pallone said at a news conference in Long Branch. “Coastal restoration projects like beach replenishment ensure our beautiful beaches will remain safe and enjoyable for residents and tourists for years to come.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The latest projects complement work done in the three towns that started last fall and was completed over the summer. It should be completed by the end of November if there are no weather-related delays.

The 65% federal share comes from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers budget, Pallone said.

“This summer’s beach replenishment project created larger and more beautiful beaches in Long Branch at a time when it was able to significantly benefit our local economy,” said Long Branch Mayor John Pallone, the congressman’s younger brother.

Work on beaches along the state’s entire 127-mile coastline has been carried out for decades but took on a greater urgency after Sandy in 2012. Even after major projects are completed, they need to be regularly maintained, including supplemental sand pumping of the type to begin this week in Long Branch.

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC