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Ohio governor sets dates to fill vacant congressional seat

March 18, 2021 GMT
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency nominee Michael Regan, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Environment and Public Works committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)
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Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency nominee Michael Regan, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Environment and Public Works committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)
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Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency nominee Michael Regan, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Environment and Public Works committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Elections will be held in August and November to fill a vacant Ohio congressional seat following the appointment of U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced Thursday.

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday confirmed Fudge to head the agency. The Democrat, whose district includes parts of Akron and Cleveland, has been in Congress since 2008.

The primary for Fudge’s seat will be held Aug. 3 and the special election on Nov. 2. The seat will remain empty until the November election.

DeWine said a May primary and earlier special election would have been preferable, but there wasn’t enough time to arrange for absentee ballots by May.

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Ohio’s elections chief said the number of days between the setting of an election calendar and the primary and special elections are similar to schedules set in 2015 to replace former House Speaker John Boehner and in 2018 to replace former U.S. Rep. Pat Tiberi.

“Though the Senate took a much longer time than expected to confirm Secretary Fudge, the Governor has picked an election schedule that is fair to both candidates and voters alike, and consistent with past special election timelines,” said GOP Secretary of State Frank LaRose.