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Tuesday’s Sports in Brief

January 19, 2022 GMT

NFL PLAYOFFS

FRISCO, Texas (AP) — Dak Prescott apologized Tuesday night for his comments that condoned Dallas Cowboys fans throwing objects at NFL officials after the team’s playoff loss, with the quarterback saying in a series of tweets that he deeply regretted what he said after the game.

When initially asked about objects such as water bottles being thrown at Dallas players as they left the field at the end of their 23-17 wild-card loss to the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday, Prescott said it was “sad” fans would do that. After another reporter said it appeared that officials were the targets, the quarterback responded, “Credit to them then.”

When given another chance to answer a question about fans throwing objects at officials, Prescott said, “I guess it’s why the refs took off and got out of there so fast. I think everybody was upset about the way that this thing played out.”

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Prescott had since received plenty of pushback nationally for his comments, even drawing the ire of NBA referees.

PRO HOCKEY

BOSTON. (AP) — Willie O’Ree’s No. 22 now has a permanent home in Boston’s TD Garden.

The first Black player to appear in an NHL game, O’Ree became the 12th player in franchise history to have his number retired prior to the Bruins’ matchup with the Carolina Hurricanes on Tuesday night.

The honor came 64 years to the day after he became the league’s first Black player on Jan. 18, 1958, when he suited up against the Montreal Canadiens. O’Ree was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in the builder category in 2018.

The pregame ceremony included a video montage with highlights of O’Ree’s career, as well as comments from various people who expressed how O’Ree touched their lives.

The Canadian-born O’Ree said during his speech that as a young boy growing up in Fredericton, New Brunswick, he grew up rooting for Montreal. Washington.

WORLD CUP

Fans can start registering to buy Qatar World Cup tickets on Wednesday with prices for visitors starting at around $70, one-third cheaper than the tournament in Russia, The Associated Press has learned.

The category-three tickets on international sale will be 250 Qatari riyals ($69), two people with knowledge of the prices said Tuesday, compared to $105 for the equivalent in 2018. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the ticketing process.

The cheapest tickets — in category four only for Qatari residents — will cost 40 Qatari riyals ($11), the people said. The intended ticket prices will be the cheapest at a World Cup since $3 seats in Mexico — based on 1986 exchange rates — and half the price of those made available to locals at the equivalent of $22 in Russia in 2018.

The low entry point for tickets in Qatar could help to provide access to the low-paid migrant worker population for the Nov. 21-Dec. 18 tournament. The cheapest tickets at the 2019 world track and field championships were 60 Qatari riyals ($17) and entry was eventually made free for workers to fill empty seats.