AP Sportlight

July 24, 2019 GMT

July 28

1913 — The United States wins its first Davis Cup since 1902 by beating Britain three matches to two.

1928 — The Summer Olympics open in Amsterdam and the Olympic flame is lit for the first time.

1929 — The Chicago Cardinals become the first NFL team to train out of state, holding camp in Michigan.

1972 — The American Basketball Association announces that San Diego will receive a franchise and the NBA’s Buffalo Braves relocate to San Diego and are renamed the San Diego Clippers.

1984 — The Summer Olympics open in Los Angeles with a record 140 nations competing. The Soviet Union and 13 Communist allies, including Cuba and East Germany, boycott the Games.

1987 — Laura Davies shoots a 1-under 71 to defeat Ayako Okamoto and JoAnne Carner in an 18-hole playoff to win the U.S. Women’s Open.

1987 — Angel Cordero Jr. becomes the fourth U.S. jockey to win 6,000 races when he rides Lost Kitty to victory at Monmouth Park, N.J.

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1991 — Dennis Martinez pitches a perfect game as the Montreal Expos beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 2-0.

1992 — American Mike Barrowman sets a world record in winning the 200-meter breaststroke, and Russian Evgueni Sadovyi becomes the Summer Olympics’ first triple gold medalist, also smashing a world record in the men’s 400-meter freestyle.

1994 — On the night baseball players set an Aug. 12 strike date, Kenny Rogers of the Texas Rangers pitches a perfect game for a 4-0 victory over California.

2000 — Blaine Wilson, America’s pre-eminent gymnast, wins his fifth straight U.S. championship in St. Louis. He becomes the first gymnast to win five straight national titles since George Wheeler did it from 1937-41.

2009 — Germany’s Paul Biedermann hands Michael Phelps his first major individual loss in four years, setting a world record in the 200-meter freestyle at the world championships in Rome. Phelps, a body length behind, suffers his first loss in a major international meet since Ian Crocker beat him in the final of the 100 butterfly at the 2005 world championships.

2016 — Mirim Lee shoots a 10-under 62 to match the Women’s British Open record and open a three-stroke lead in the major championship at tree-lined Woburn (England) Golf Club.

2016 — Stephan Jaeger shoots a 12-under 58 in the Web.com Tour’s Ellie Mae Classic for the lowest score in major tour play. The 27-year-old German player finishes with a 10-foot birdie putt on the par-5 ninth at TPC Stonebrae.

2017 — The U.S. women claim a record-extending fifth world championship in water polo with a 13-6 victory over Spain. Kiley Neushul scores four goals to help the two-time Olympic champions win back-to-back titles at the worlds.

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2018 — The Washington Valor, who lost 10 of their 12 regular season games, wins the 2018 Arena Football League championship 69-55 over the Baltimore Brigade in Arena Bowl XXXI. With four teams in the league, each played four times against every other squad. In a two-game aggregate semifinal, Washington lost the opener to Albany 57-56, but won the second game 47-40 to meet Baltimore.

July 29

1751 — The first International World Title Prize Fight takes place in Harlston, Norfolk, England. The champion, Jack Slack of England, beats the challenger, M. Petit of France, in 25 minutes.

1934 — Paul Runyan beats Craig Wood on the 38th hole to win the PGA Championship at Park Country Club in Williamsville, N.Y.

1956 — Cathy Cornelius wins a playoff over Barbara McIntyre to win the U.S. Women’s Open.

1957 — At the Polo Grounds in New York, Floyd Patterson TKOs Tommy Jackson at 1:52 of the 10th round to retain the heavyweight title.

1960 — The first American Football League preseason is played at War Memorial Stadium in Buffalo. The Boston Patriots, led by quarterback Butch Songin, beat the Bills 28-7 in front of 16,474 curious fans.

1979 — Amy Alcott shoots a 7-under 285 to beat Nancy Lopez in the Peter Jackson Classic, later named The du Maurier Classic. The du Maurier is one of the LPGA Tour’s major championships from 1979-2000.

1980 — Wladyslaw Kozakiewicz of Poland sets an Olympic record in the pole vault with a vault of 18-11½ in Moscow.

1986 — The United States Football League wins and loses in its lawsuit against the National Football League. The jury finds that the NFL violated antitrust laws, as the USFL claimed, but awards the USFL only $1 in damages.

1989 — Cuba’s Javier Sotomayor becomes the first person to jump 8 feet, setting a world record at the Caribbean Championship in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in the high jump. Sotomayor held the record at 7-11½.

1990 — Beth Daniel shoots a 66 to overcome a 5-shot deficit and win the LPGA Championship — her first major title in 12 years on the tour. Daniel beats Rosie Jones by one stroke and pockets $150,000, the largest in LPGA Tour history.

1992 — The U.S. 400-meter freestyle relay team wins the gold medal as Matt Biondi and Tom Jager become the first U.S. male swimmers to win golds in three Olympics.

1996 — Record-setting sprinter Michael Johnson sweeps to victory in an Olympic 400-meter record 43.49 seconds, while Carl Lewis leaps into history in Atlanta. Lewis’ long jump of 27 feet, 10¾ inches earns him his ninth gold medal, equaling the American mark held by swimmer Mark Spitz.

2008 — Disgraced ex-NBA official Tim Donaghy admits that he’d brought shame on his profession as a federal judge sentenced him to 15 months behind bars for a gambling scandal.

2012 — Kimberly Rhode wins the Olympic gold medal in women’s skeet shooting, making her the first American to take an individual-sport medal in five consecutive Olympics.

2015 — Russia’s Natalya Ishchenko wins a record 18th career synchronized swimming gold medal at the world championships at Kazan, Russia. Ishchenko beats China’s Huang Xuechen in the solo free routine by 1.5333 to move one ahead of her longtime duet partner Svetlana Romashina, who has 17 world championship gold medals.

2017 — Caeleb Dressel becomes the first swimmer to win three gold medals on a single night at the world championships. America’s newest star turns in a stunning performance, racing three times over the course of about two hours — and winning every time.

July 30

1870 — Monmouth Park opens with a five-day race meet.

1930 — Uruguay beats Argentina 4-2 for soccer’s first World Cup in Montevideo.

1932 — The 10th modern Olympic Games open in Los Angeles.

1961 — Jerry Barber edges Don January by one stroke in a playoff to win the PGA title. shoots a 277 at Olympia Fields IL

1966 — England beats West Germany 4-2 at London’s Wembley Stadium to capture soccer’s World Cup. West Germany’s Wolgang Weber ties the game with one minute left in regulation. Geoff Hurst scores twice in extra time to become the first player to score three goals in a final.

1968 — Washington’s Ron Hansen pulls off an unassisted triple play, but the Cleveland Indians still win 10-1.

1976 — Bruce Jenner sets the world record in the Olympic decathlon with 8,618 points, breaking Nikolai Avilov’s mark by 164 points.

1984 — Michael Gross of West Germany sets a world record in the 200-meter freestyle with a time of 1:47.44 at a meet in Munich.

1996 — The American softball team wins the gold medal, beating China 3-1 behind a controversial two-run homer from Dot Richardson in the first Olympic competition in that sport.

2004 — At the London Grand Prix meet, Russia’s Yelena Isinbayeva breaks the pole vault world record for the third time in five weeks, clearing 16 feet, ¾ inch at Crystal Palace.

2009 — Seven more world records on the fifth night of the world swimming championships in Rome are set, pushing the total to 29 and moving past last summer’s Beijing Olympics. Ryan Lochte gets things rolling by breaking Phelps’ mark in the 200-meter individual medley. The Chinese women finish it off, eclipsing the 800 freestyle relay mark by more than two seconds, with the Americans also breaking the previous record but only getting silver.

2012 — In London, Missy Franklin, a 17-year-old from Colorado, wins the women’s 100-meter backstroke. Franklin has a brief 13-minute break after taking the final qualifying spot in the 200 freestyle semifinals before she had to get back into the water for the backstroke final. Fifteen-year-old Ruta Meilutyte becomes the first Lithuanian to win an Olympic swimming medal by holding off a late charge from world champion Rebecca Soni of the United States in the 100 breaststroke.

2017 — Caeleb Dressel wins his seventh gold medal of the world swimming championships in Budapest, Hungary, putting the U.S. team ahead to stay with another dominating swim in the 4x100-meter medley relay. Dressel joins Michael Phelps in another elite club with seven golds at the second-biggest meet after the Olympics. Phelps had seven victories at the 2007 worlds in Melbourne, Australia.

2017 — Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers becomes the first player from the Dominican Republic, and 31st overall, to join the 3,000-hit club during a 10-6 loss to Baltimore.

2017 — J.R. Todd becomes the first black winner in NHRA Funny Car history, beating Tim Wilkerson in the Sonoma (Calif.) Nationals.

July 31

1932 — France beats the United States 3-2 for its sixth consecutive Davis Cup championship.

1942 — Jockey Bill Turnbull wins seven of nine races at Rockingham Park in Salem, New Hampshire.

1954 — Joe Adcock hits four homers and a double to give the Milwaukee Braves a 15-7 victory over Brooklyn.

1963 — The Cleveland Indians become the first American League club to hit four straight home runs and in an unlikely fashion. Number eight hitter Woody Held hits a two-out homer off Paul Foytack, pitcher Pedro Ramos follows with his second homer of the game, Tito Francona and Larry Brown’s first major league homer finish the string. Foytack is the only major league pitcher to give up four straight home runs.

1973 — Julius Erving, the American Basketball Association’s leading scorer, is traded by the cash-strapped Virginia Squires to the New York Nets for forward George Carter and cash.

1983 — Jan Stephenson beats JoAnne Carner and Patty Sheehan by one stroke to win the U.S. Women’s Open.

1990 — Nolan Ryan wins his 300th game, reaching the milestone in his second try, as the Texas Rangers beat the Milwaukee Brewers 11-3.

1993 — Mike Aulby becomes the third player in PBA history to win a tournament by rolling a 300 game in the title game. Aulby beats David Ozio 300-279 in the Wichita Open.

1994 — Sergei Bubka sets a world pole vault record for the 35th time in his career at a meet in Sestriere, Italy. Bubka soars 20 feet, 1 3/4 inches, adding a half-inch to his old mark set in Tokyo in 1992.

2005 — Grant Hackett becomes the first swimmer to win four straight world titles in the same event, capturing another 1,500-meter freestyle. The Aussie stretches out his own record for world championship medals to 17.

2007 — All-Star Kevin Garnett is traded from the Minnesota Timberwolves to Boston for five players and two draft picks. The Celtics obtain the former MVP and 10-time All-Star from Minnesota for forwards Al Jefferson, Ryan Gomes and Gerald Green, guard Sebastian Telfair and center Theo Ratliff and two first-round draft picks.

2011 — Yani Tseng wins the Women’s British Open for the second straight year, beating Brittany Lang by four strokes and becoming the youngest woman to capture a fifth major title. The 22-year-old top-ranked Taiwanese shot a 3-under 69 to finish at 16-under 272.

2012 — Michael Phelps breaks the Olympic medals record with his 19th as the United States romp to a dominating win in 4x200-meter freestyle relay at the London Games. With 19 career medals spanning three Olympics, Phelps moves one ahead of Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina, who got her haul in 1956, 1960 and 1964.

2012 — The team of Gabrielle Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Alexandra Raisman, Kyla Ross and Jordyn Wieber lives up to all the hype, winning the first U.S. Olympic title in women’s gymnastics since 1996.

2016 — Jimmy Walker shoots a 3-under-par 67 to win the PGA Championship at Baltusrol Golf Club, to become the fourth first-time major champion this year.

2018 — The NBA and MGM Resorts International become gambling partners, the first such relationship in the U.S. involving a major sports league.

Aug. 1

1936 — The Olympic Games open in Berlin. The opening ceremony is presided over by Adolf Hitler.

1945 — New York’s Mel Ott hits his 500th home run in a 9-2 victory over the Boston Braves at the Polo Grounds. Only Babe Ruth with 714 and Jimmie Foxx with 527 have more.

1972 — Nate Colbert of the San Diego Padres drives in 13 runs in a doubleheader sweep of the Atlanta Braves 9-0 and 11-7.

1987 — Mike Tyson unifies the heavyweight division with a 12-round unanimous decision over IBF champion Tony Tucker in Las Vegas.

1990 — Arkansas jumps to the Southeastern Conference, severing its 76-year tie to the troubled Southwest Conference.

1992 — Eric Griffin, a two-time world champion at 106 pounds, loses to Rafael Lozano of Spain under the new electronic scoring system used at the Summer Olympics, even though all five judges credit him with more blows than his opponent as did five jury members used as a backup in case the computer failed.

1996 — Michael Johnson wins Olympic gold in the 200 meters in a record 19.32 seconds, becoming the first male Olympian to win the 200 and 400 in a single games. Dan O’Brien wins gold in the decathlon, four years after failing to make the U.S. Olympic team.

2004 — Karen Stupples wins her first major title with a record-tying 19-under 269 at the Women’s British Open. Stupples ties the low score in a major, set by Dottie Pepper at the 1999 Nabisco Dinah Shore.

2009 — Rachel Alexandra speeds around the far turn and rolls past the boys once again to win the $1.25 million Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Park and establishes herself as one of the greatest fillies in thoroughbred racing. The bay filly, ridden by Calvin Borel, beats Belmont Stakes winner Summer Bird by six lengths.

2010 — Stuart Appleby hits golf’s magic number, shooting a 59 to win the Greenbrier Classic. Appleby’s 11-under round puts him at 22 while third-round leader Jeff Overton finishes second by one stroke after his birdie try slid by the hole on the par-3 18th. Appleby is the fifth PGA Tour player to reach the milestone.

2010 — Yani Tseng of Taiwan makes a 6-foot putt on the 18th hole to win the Women’s British Open by one stroke over Katherine Hull of Australia. It’s the 21-year-old Tseng’s third major title and second of the year to go along with the Kraft Nabisco.

2010 — Bob and Mike Bryan win their record 62nd career doubles title on the ATP Tour. The twin brothers, who beat Eric Butorac and Jean-Julien Rojer in the Farmers Classic, were tied with Hall of Famers Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde of Australia, who won 61 titles.

2012 — Four teams are kicked out of the women’s badminton doubles at the London Games for trying to lose on purpose. The eight doubles players from China, South Korea and Indonesia are cited by the Badminton World Federation for “conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport.” South Korea and Indonesia appeal the disqualification, but the BWF rejects the South Korean appeal and the Indonesia challenge is withdrawn. China had accepts the federation’s earlier decision.

Aug. 2

1864 — The first Travers Stakes at Saratoga is won by Kentucky, a horse that scores 20 consecutive victories.

1912 — John McDermott wins the U.S. Open golf championship for the second straight year with a 294 total.

1952 — Five American boxers win gold medals at the Olympics, marking the first time the U.S. wins the unofficial team title. The five medalists are flyweight Nate Brooks; light welterweight Charley Adkins; middleweight Floyd Patterson; light heavyweight Norvell Lee and heavyweight Eddie Sanders.

1959 — Bob Rosburg comes back from six strokes down, shooting a four-under 66, to win the PGA Championship held at Minneapolis Gulf Club. Rosburg finishes with a three-under 277 to finish one stroke ahead of Jerry Barber and Doug Sanders.

1967 — The New Orleans Saints play their first preseason game and lose to the Los Angeles Rams, 77-16.

1979 — New York Yankees catcher Thurman Munson is killed in a plane crash practicing takeoffs and landings near his Ohio home.

1986 — Jackie Joyner sets the world record in the heptathlon at the U.S. Olympic Festival in Houston with 7,158 points.

1992 — Vitaly Scherbo of the Unified Team wins gold medals in the vault, rings, pommel horse and parallel bars to give him a total of six gold, the most won by a gymnast in a single Olympic Games.

1996 — Down to her final long jump attempt and fighting an injured hamstring, Jackie Joyner-Kersee leaps out of sixth place and ends her Olympic career with a bronze medal. Joyner Kersee jumps 22 feet, 11 3-4 inches for her sixth Olympic medal.

1998 — Brandie Burton closes with an even-par 72 for a tournament-record 18-under 270, and holds on to win the du Maurier Classic by one stroke over Annika Sorenstam. It’s the lowest score in relation to par at a women’s major, breaking Betsy King’s 17-under 267 in the 1992 LPGA Championship.

2005 — In the largest trade in NBA history, Antoine Walker is dealt from Boston to Miami in a transaction involving five teams and 13 players. The Heat acquires point guard Jason Williams and small forward James Posey from Memphis, while the Grizzlies receive guard Eddie Jones from the Heat. The New Orleans Hornets and Utah Jazz also are involved in the deal.

2009 — Catriona Matthew wins the Women’s British Open for her first major title, beating Karrie Webb by three strokes just 10 weeks after giving birth to her second child.

2012 — Carmelo Anthony and the U.S. men’s Olympic basketball team rewrite the record book in a 156-73 romp over Nigeria. The U.S. led by 26 in the first quarter, had an Olympic-record 78 points in the first half and Anthony scored 37 points, including 10 of 12 3-pointers, to break the U.S. single-game scoring record in less than three quarters. When Andre Iguodala hits a 3-pointer with 4:37 left, the Americans surpass the previous Olympic record of 138 points set by Brazil against Egypt in 1988.

2012 — Gabby Douglas becomes the third straight American to win gymnastics’ biggest prize when she wins the all-around Olympic title.

2012 — Michael Phelps adds to his Olympic medal collection with his first individual gold medal of the London Games in the 200-meter individual medley. The U.S. star becomes the first male swimmer to win the same individual event at three straight Olympics, capturing his 20th career medal — and 16th gold.

2015 — Inbee Park rallies to win the Women’s British Open to become the seventh women to win four different major championships.

Aug. 3

1852 — The first intercollegiate rowing race is held on Lake Winnipesaukee, N.H., where Harvard beats Yale by four lengths on the 2-mile course.

1949 — The National Basketball Association is formed by the merger of the National Basketball League (NBL) and the Basketball Association of America (BAA). Maurice Podoloff, head of the BAA since its inception, is elected head of the new league. Six NBL teams join the ten BAA teams, plus an expansion team in Indianapolis, to form the NBA.

1955 — Scott Frost, driven by Joe O’Brien, wins the Hambletonian at Good Time Park in Goshen, N.Y. He goes on to become the first trotting Triple Crown winner.

1985 — France’s Lutin D’Isigny becomes the first trotter to sweep the International Trot and Challenge Cup in consecutive years with a 3:03.1 time in the 1½-mile test.

1990 — The Professional Golfers Association Tour announces it will not hold tournaments at golf clubs that have all-white memberships or show any other signs of discrimination.

1996 — Andre Agassi, the Dream Team and the U.S. women’s 400-meter relay team win Olympic gold medals, while the American men’s 400 relay settles for silver. With Carl Lewis idled by a coach’s decision and Leroy Burrell injured, the men’s 400 team is shocked by Canada — the first time the U.S. lost the event at the Olympics.

1997 — Colleen Walker wins the du Maurier Classic by two strokes over Liselotte Neumann. Her 65 is one stroke off the best final round recorded in an LPGA major, a 9-under 64 by JoAnne Carner in the 1978 du Maurier.

2003 — Annika Sorenstam completes a career Grand Slam at the Women’s British Open, beating Se Ri Pak by a stroke in a thrilling head-to-head showdown.

2006 — Champ Car driver Cristiano da Matta needs surgery to remove a ruptured blood vessel in his head after his race car collides with a deer that wandered onto the track during a test session at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wis.

2012 — Michael Phelps rallies to win the 100-meter butterfly for his third gold of the London Games and No. 17 of his career. The American, next-to-last at the turn, closes strong to finish in 51.21 seconds, just ahead of Chad le Clos of South Africa and Evgeny Korotyshkin of Russia. It’s Phelps’ third consecutive win in the event at the Olympics, and his 21st career medal. Missy Franklin sets a world record in the 200 backstroke for the 17-year-old’s third gold in London. Also, 15-year-old Katie Ledecky — the youngest member of the U.S. team — nearly breaks the world record while winning the 800 freestyle, denying Britain’s Rebecca Adlington a repeat before her home fans.

2013 — Sixteen-year-old Katie Ledecky wraps up a brilliant performance at the world swimming championships with her fourth gold medal and second world record. The youngster turns it on over the final four laps of the 800 freestyle to win in 8 minutes, 13.86 seconds and take down the mark of 8:14.10 set by Britain’s Rebecca Adlington at the 2008 Olympics.

End Adv