ADVERTISEMENT

Phoenix area cooled by monsoon rain; flooding reported

July 24, 2021 GMT
The flooded Pantano Wash in Tucson, Ariz., draws crowds of onlookers where it forced closure of Harrison Road following a night of intense storms and heavy rain, Friday, July 23, 2021. (Kelly Presnell/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
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The flooded Pantano Wash in Tucson, Ariz., draws crowds of onlookers where it forced closure of Harrison Road following a night of intense storms and heavy rain, Friday, July 23, 2021. (Kelly Presnell/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
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The flooded Pantano Wash in Tucson, Ariz., draws crowds of onlookers where it forced closure of Harrison Road following a night of intense storms and heavy rain, Friday, July 23, 2021. (Kelly Presnell/Arizona Daily Star via AP)

PHOENIX (AP) — Scorching summer heat in Phoenix has been replaced by rain, lightning, flooding and cool temperatures because of monsoon thunderstorms.

Scattered storms that began Thursday continued through Friday, with about 60% of metro Phoenix reporting received measurable rainfall, the Arizona Republic reported.

By evening, flash flooding was reported in New River and parts of the northern metro area that received 2.6 inches (6.6 centimeters) of rain. The National Weather Service issued a flood warning for Maricopa County until Saturday morning near Lake Pleasant and New River Anthem.

Forecasts called for more of the same into the weekend.

Sky Harbor International Airport received just over 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) of rain during the storm, topping the amount of rain during the entire monsoon season last year.

The high temperature for the day was 83 degrees Fahrenheit (28 Celsius) at the airport, well below the average 106 F (41 C) for the date.

Several parts of the region received more than an inch (2.5 centimeters) of rain, including in Phoenix and Scottsdale, azfamily.com reported.

Residents reported fallen trees and fencing and filled flood channels. Motorists stopped to marvel at the water roiling in normally dry desert washes in foothills suburbs.

Forecasters warned that areas with burn scars from old wildfires could be at risk for flash flooding.

In more urban areas like Phoenix, flooding was reported on highways, streets and underpasses. Drivers were advised not to try to cross any flooded path.