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Stephen King helps kids publish pandemic-inspired book

February 8, 2021 GMT
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 22, 2018, file photo, PEN literary service award recipient Stephen King attends the 2018 PEN Literary Gala in New York. Readers may know him best for “Carrie,” “The Shining” and other bestsellers commonly identified as “horror,” but King has long had an affinity for other kinds of narratives, from science fiction and prison drama to the Boston Red Sox.  (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 22, 2018, file photo, PEN literary service award recipient Stephen King attends the 2018 PEN Literary Gala in New York. Readers may know him best for “Carrie,” “The Shining” and other bestsellers commonly identified as “horror,” but King has long had an affinity for other kinds of narratives, from science fiction and prison drama to the Boston Red Sox.  (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 22, 2018, file photo, PEN literary service award recipient Stephen King attends the 2018 PEN Literary Gala in New York. Readers may know him best for “Carrie,” “The Shining” and other bestsellers commonly identified as “horror,” but King has long had an affinity for other kinds of narratives, from science fiction and prison drama to the Boston Red Sox.  (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 22, 2018, file photo, PEN literary service award recipient Stephen King attends the 2018 PEN Literary Gala in New York. Readers may know him best for “Carrie,” “The Shining” and other bestsellers commonly identified as “horror,” but King has long had an affinity for other kinds of narratives, from science fiction and prison drama to the Boston Red Sox. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 22, 2018, file photo, PEN literary service award recipient Stephen King attends the 2018 PEN Literary Gala in New York. Readers may know him best for “Carrie,” “The Shining” and other bestsellers commonly identified as “horror,” but King has long had an affinity for other kinds of narratives, from science fiction and prison drama to the Boston Red Sox. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

LEWISTON, Maine (AP) — A group of budding young writers is about to publish a book with some help from Maine’s most famous writer.

Stephen King’s foundation covered the $6,500 cost of publishing a 290-page manuscript by students participating in Farwell Elementary School’s Author Studies Program.

The students started with “Fletcher McKenzie and the Passage to Whole,” a story about a Maine boy by Gary Savage, and then reworked it to reflect their experiences during the pandemic.

Farwell Principal Amanda Winslow said she is proud of the students for their accomplishment and thankful for the dedication of Savage, who advised the students, and librarian Kathy Martin.

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A number of local groups also sent donations that will be used for the Author Studies program.