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20 convicted in Paris terrorist attacks trial: Who they are

June 29, 2022 GMT
FILE - Sept.8, 2021 file sketch shows key defendant Salah Abdeslam, right, and Mohamed Abrini in the special courtroom built for the 2015 attacks trial. Salah Abdeslam is one of 10 attackers who set out Nov. 13, 2015 wearing explosives vests for a series of coordinated attacks. For charges including terrorist murder and kidnapping, he faces up to life in prison. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, Mohamed Abrini risks up to a life sentence. A total of 20 people are facing a verdict Wednesday June 29, 2022 over the 2015 Paris attacks by Islamic State extremists that killed 130 people. (Noelle Herrenschmidt via AP, File)
FILE - Sept.8, 2021 file sketch shows key defendant Salah Abdeslam, right, and Mohamed Abrini in the special courtroom built for the 2015 attacks trial. Salah Abdeslam is one of 10 attackers who set out Nov. 13, 2015 wearing explosives vests for a series of coordinated attacks. For charges including terrorist murder and kidnapping, he faces up to life in prison. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, Mohamed Abrini risks up to a life sentence. A total of 20 people are facing a verdict Wednesday June 29, 2022 over the 2015 Paris attacks by Islamic State extremists that killed 130 people. (Noelle Herrenschmidt via AP, File)
FILE - Sept.8, 2021 file sketch shows key defendant Salah Abdeslam, right, and Mohamed Abrini in the special courtroom built for the 2015 attacks trial. Salah Abdeslam is one of 10 attackers who set out Nov. 13, 2015 wearing explosives vests for a series of coordinated attacks. For charges including terrorist murder and kidnapping, he faces up to life in prison. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, Mohamed Abrini risks up to a life sentence. A total of 20 people are facing a verdict Wednesday June 29, 2022 over the 2015 Paris attacks by Islamic State extremists that killed 130 people. (Noelle Herrenschmidt via AP, File)
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FILE - Sept.8, 2021 file sketch shows key defendant Salah Abdeslam, right, and Mohamed Abrini in the special courtroom built for the 2015 attacks trial. Salah Abdeslam is one of 10 attackers who set out Nov. 13, 2015 wearing explosives vests for a series of coordinated attacks. For charges including terrorist murder and kidnapping, he faces up to life in prison. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, Mohamed Abrini risks up to a life sentence. A total of 20 people are facing a verdict Wednesday June 29, 2022 over the 2015 Paris attacks by Islamic State extremists that killed 130 people. (Noelle Herrenschmidt via AP, File)
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FILE - Sept.8, 2021 file sketch shows key defendant Salah Abdeslam, right, and Mohamed Abrini in the special courtroom built for the 2015 attacks trial. Salah Abdeslam is one of 10 attackers who set out Nov. 13, 2015 wearing explosives vests for a series of coordinated attacks. For charges including terrorist murder and kidnapping, he faces up to life in prison. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, Mohamed Abrini risks up to a life sentence. A total of 20 people are facing a verdict Wednesday June 29, 2022 over the 2015 Paris attacks by Islamic State extremists that killed 130 people. (Noelle Herrenschmidt via AP, File)

PARIS (AP) — A total of 20 men were convicted Wednesday over the 2015 Paris attacks by Islamic State extremists on the Bataclan theater, Paris cafes and the national stadium.

Most attention has focused on the lone surviving member of the attack team, Salah Abdeslam. Others were found guilty of preparing the attacks, which killed 130 people, or hiding Abdeslam from police. Some are presumed dead in Syria and were tried in absentia. Some acknowledged helping the assailants but said they were unaware of the overall attack plot.

Some face charges in the related attacks in March 2016 on the Brussels airport and metro.

Here is a look at who they are, what they’re accused of and what sentences they were given in Paris:

ACCUSED IN COMMANDO OPERATIONS

Salah Abdeslam, 32: The only survivor of the 10 attackers who set out Nov. 13, 2015, wearing explosives vests for a series of coordinated attacks. His vest was later found abandoned, undetonated. For charges including terrorist murder and kidnapping, he was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole.

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Mohamed Abrini, 37: Fought with Islamic State in Syria-Iraq, accused of a managerial role, transporting attackers and weapons. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole for 22 years.

Sofien Ayari, 28: Fought with Islamic State in Syria-Iraq, accused of training attackers, supplying weapons and plotting attack on Amsterdam airport. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

Osama Krayem, 29: Fought with Islamic State in Syria-Iraq, accused of training attackers, supplying weapons and plotting a never-realized attack on Amsterdam airport. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

ACCUSED OF OPERATIONAL ROLE:

Omar Darif, aka Ahmad Alkhald (presumed dead in Syria; tried in absentia): Fought with Islamic State group, accused of training attackers, organizing attacks. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole for 30 years.

Mohamed Bakkali, 35: Accused of helping plot the attacks, hiding and transporting the attackers. On charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

Fabien and Jean-Michel Clain (presumed dead in Syria; tried in absentia): Two brothers who converted to Islam and fought in Syria-Iraq, suspected of making video and audio messages in which Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attacks. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, they were sentenced to life in prison with no parole.

Ahmed Dahmani, 33 (in prison in Turkey; tried in absentia): Fought in Syria-Iraq, accused of supplying weapons and explosives and helping prepare the attacks. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

Oussama Atar (presumed dead in Syria; tried in absentia): Accused of helping organize the attacks from Syria and Iraq and recruiting attackers. For charges including directing a terrorist group, he was sentenced to life with no parole.

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Obeida Aref Dibo (presumed dead in Syria; tried in absentia): Fought with Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq, accused of arranging for attackers’ travel, direct involvement in organizing attacks. For charges including complicity to terrorist murder, he was sentenced to life with no parole.

Adel Haddadi, 34: Fought in Syria-Iraq, accused of agreeing to take part in an attack; sentenced to 18 years in prison on charges of criminal association with a terrorist enterprise.

Muhammad Usman, 29: Fought in Syria-Iraq, accused of agreeing to take part in an attack; sentenced to 18 years in prison on charges of criminal association with a terrorist enterprise.

ACCUSED OF LINKS WITH TERRORISTS

Ali El Haddad Asufi, 37: Accused of accompanying or helping other members of the group; sentenced to 10 years in prison for criminal association with a terrorist enterprise.

Yassine Atar, 35: Accused of accompanying or helping other members of the group, sentenced to eight years in prison for criminal association with a terrorist enterprise.

HELPING ABDESLAM

Mohammed Amri, 33: Accused of helping Abdeslam prepare the attacks and flee France afterward for Belgium. For charges including criminal association with a terrorist enterprise, he was sentenced to eight years in prison.

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Hamza Attou, 28: Accused of helping Abdeslam flee France after the attacks for Belgium. For charges of relations with a terrorist enterprise, he was sentenced to four years in prison, two of them suspended.

BELGIAN HELPERS

Ali Oulkadi, 37: Accused of helping Abdeslam prepare the attacks and hide from police after he fled to Belgium. For charges including criminal association with a terrorist enterprise, he was sentenced to five years in prison, three of them suspended.

Abdellah Chouaa, 41: Accused of helping the cell in Belgium without knowing its terrorist intent, he was sentenced to four years in prison, three of them suspended, for criminal association with a terrorist enterprise.

Farid Kharkhach, 39: Accused of helping the cell in Belgium without knowing its terrorist intent, he was sentenced to two years in prison for fraud, but the terrorism charge against him was dropped.