AP NEWS

Defendant in ski fraud case allowed passport for work

November 27, 2019 GMT

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — A judge is allowing the former president of the Jay Peak Ski Resort who’s accused in a multimillion-dollar fraud case to have his passport so that he can travel internationally for work.

William Stenger, former Jay Peak owner Ariel Quiros and Quiros’ adviser William Kelly have pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiring to embezzle investor funds and deceive investors about a proposed biotechnology project.

Stenger asked for his passport back, saying he would like to pursue international consulting opportunities to support his family.

The court on Tuesday granted the request with conditions that travel is restricted to Canada and Japan and countries passed through on the way. The trips must be approved in advance by U.S. probation and Stenger must pledge his principal residence as security.