AP NEWS

Fitchburg is One Big Speedway

May 22, 2019

It seems like yesterday residents of Fitchburg were hearing the words:

“I hear what you hear. I see what you see. I experience what you experience. That is why I am a candidate for Mayor of Fitchburg.” — Stephen DiNatale, candidate for mayor.

Well, Mr. Mayor, I hear the sound of racing engines. I see cars speeding on our residential streets. I see cars racing through red lights. I see cars traveling on the wrong side of the road. I see cars not stopping for “STOP” signs. I experience cars running me off of the road. I experience cars speeding past my house in a residential zone. I experience cars not yielding to my right-of-way. I experience cars tail-gating as I drive at the speed limit.

This problem is a citywide, long-standing problem and it becomes even more apparent in the spring, when roads are less affected by snow. It is also obvious at night when the sound of racing cars echoes in the darkness. Whatever the city’s response has been, it has been impotent. Irresponsible drivers are holding lawful drivers hostage because there is nothing to stop these careless people and they know that. The law exists only where drivers are compliant or the law is enforced.

Other, more progressive cities and towns are dealing with this problem in ways that are as extensive as the infractions are aggressive. A few hundred token citations per year will not get the job done. GPS and traffic apps are guiding drivers through neighborhood roads that were never intended to be shortcuts or highway offramps. Our quality of life and safety are being put at risk because the city does not have the resolve to make this a priority, think “out of the box” and do something about it.

Tom Lomaglio Jr.

Fitchburg

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