AP NEWS

Olander Wilson makes return to ‘The Perfect Murder’

September 27, 2018 GMT

LAKE CITY, S.C. – Lake City native Olander Wilson is making his return to the Investigation Discovery Channel’s murder mystery show Thursday night, this time as the friend of a former college football player.

Wilson will star in “The Perfect Murder’s” season five finale at 9 tonight. This week’s episode focuses on Marlin Barnes, a former University of Miami football player who was found dead in 1996. Wilson will star in the show as Shabaka, Barnes’ best friend.

“Shabaka, he’d known Marlin for like all of his life,” Wilson said. “They went to (a) party together the night before he got killed. But they had a good time, enjoying life.”

Wilson said the next morning, Barnes and his girlfriend were found dead; one was stabbed and the other was shot.

“I was the one to blame because I was the last one with him,” Wilson said. “But of course that did not happen. I wasn’t the killer. That’s one of the things that’s going to leave the audience on the edge.”

To find out who really killed Barnes, tune in to “The Perfect Murder” tonight.

Network channels include:

>> Dish Network: Channel 192

>> Optimum: Channel 173

>> DirecTV: Channel 285

>> Time Warner/Spectrum: Channel 138

>> Comcast: Channel 889 (HD) / 111 (SD)

>> Verizon Fios: Channel 623 (HD) / 123 (SD)

>> FTC: Channel 1105 (HD) / 105 (SD)

In addition to “The Perfect Murder,” Wilson is working on several other projects. The Lake City native is now living in New York and recently started a TV film production class for middle school students in the South Bronx area. Wilson said the South Bronx is in one of the poorest congressional districts in the nation. Forty-nine percent of the children are living in poverty, he said.

“So (I’m) giving kids the opportunity to not only learn about filmmaking and acting but also learn the arts, STEM, ELA, basic literature skills,” Wilson said.

He serves students who are in grades six to eight, but many of them read on second- and third-grade levels.

“So, it’s one of those things I’m kind of proud of doing,” Wilson said. “Last year we brought their reading level up 56 percent. And now they’re on reading level or almost at reading level.”

Students in Wilson’s Academy Award Actors (Triple A) program are introduced to acting and filmmaking and use those skills to create a film.

“Scholars learn to articulate the cinematic themes through reading, writing, vocabulary, speaking, listening and self-expression,” Wilson said. “In addition, students strengthen social emotional literacy by discussing relevant adolescent themes through the filmmaking process.”

Wilson said he has been using the knowledge he has gained over the last four to five years to uplift children. And he wants to give children in Lake City an opportunity to learn hands-on from him and some of his peers. He is planning a hands-on workshop.

“I don’t have the blueprint set in stone, but I do want to do something the summer of 2019 for kids who want to act, who want to film make, who want to direct, who want to tap into the industry,” Wilson said. “I want to be able to let them know here’s a step, here’s what you need to do.”

Coaching young actors is something Wilson has been doing for a while. He is now the lead instructor for children’s division at the Mel Mack Acting Studio in New York where he trains.

Also in the works for Wilson is the release of a solo film, “The Nadir,” that he produced, directed and acted in. The film highlights the lowest point of Wilson’s last two years. He expects it to be released in November.

As for the future, Wilson said he wants to continue growing and sharing.