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The Latest: California advances police shooting restrictions

April 9, 2019
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Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, D-Sacramento, displays a sign for a proposed measure to limit the use of deadly force by police during a rally at the Capitol, Monday, April 8, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. The bill, AB392, co-authored by McCarty and Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego,, second from right, would require officers to use de-escalation tactics and allow the use of deadly force when it is necessary to prevent immediate harm to themselves or others. The measure faces heavy opposition from law enforcement organizations, which blocked a similar Senate-approved bill last year. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, D-Sacramento, displays a sign for a proposed measure to limit the use of deadly force by police during a rally at the Capitol, Monday, April 8, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. The bill, AB392, co-authored by McCarty and Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego,, second from right, would require officers to use de-escalation tactics and allow the use of deadly force when it is necessary to prevent immediate harm to themselves or others. The measure faces heavy opposition from law enforcement organizations, which blocked a similar Senate-approved bill last year. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on police use of force legislation (all times local):

11:50 a.m.

A first-in-the-nation measure restricting when police can use deadly force has moved forward in the California Legislature.

The legislation advanced Tuesday faces a tougher fight in the full Assembly. Even lawmakers supporting the measure say it may go too far as they try to balance the safety of officers and residents in the nation’s most populous state.

The measure spurred by last year’s shooting of unarmed vandalism suspect Stephon Clark would allow police to kill only if there is no reasonable alternative.

The committee’s chairman says a tougher standard will do little good without buy-in from law enforcement organizations, which support another plan.

Lawmakers are considering emotional testimony from officers and survivors of police shootings as they juggle radically different proposals intended to cut down on police shootings.

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11:30 a.m.

California lawmakers are considering emotional testimony from both officers and survivors of police shootings as they juggle radically different proposals intended to cut down on police shootings.

A public safety committee is expected to advance a first-in-the-nation measure Tuesday that would restrict when officers can use deadly force.

The proposal faces a tougher fight in the full Assembly. Some lawmakers say it may go too far as they try to balance the safety of both officers and residents in the nation’s most populous state.

The measure spurred by last year’s shooting of unarmed vandalism suspect Stephon Clark would allow police to kill only if there’s no reasonable alternative.

The committee’s chairman says a tougher standard will do little good without buy-in from law enforcement organizations, which support another plan.

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10 p.m.

California lawmakers are battling over how to cut down on police shootings as they consider two radically different proposals.

The measures have stirred an emotional debate over the safety of both officers and those they’re tasked with protecting in the nation’s most populous state.

A legislative committee is expected to advance a first-in-the-nation measure Tuesday restricting when police can use deadly force.

The bill sparked by last year’s shooting of unarmed vandalism suspect Stephon Clark would allow police to kill only if there is no reasonable alternative, such as verbal persuasion or other non-lethal methods of resolution or de-escalation.

It faces intense opposition from law enforcement groups, which support a plan requiring that every department have policies on when officers should use de-escalation tactics and other alternatives to deadly force.

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