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LaRouche Delivers AIDS Discourse In Paid Half-Hour of Network Prime Time

February 5, 1988

WASHINGTON (AP) _ Political extremist Lyndon LaRouche said on network television Thursday that the deadly AIDS virus is transmitted much like any other virus and that most medical warnings about how it is spread are ″an outright lie.″

″All the talk about safe sex is simply a propaganda stunt, part of the effort of our government to stop you from demanding that governments spend the amounts of money which must be spent to bring this epidemic under control,″ LaRouche said.

A frequent fringe candidate for president who is running again this year as a Democrat, LaRouche spoke on a 30-minute taped television program aired nationally on the CBS network. LaRouche’s campaign paid $250,000 to air the program, spokeswoman Dana Scanlon said.

LaRouche spent most of the program discussing what he said was a coming economic collapse and the regulatory and monetary steps he would take as president.

He said AIDS is ″the most deadly pandemic ever to threaten mankind.″ LaRouche, who has contended previously that AIDS is spread by mosquitos, compared its incidence in Africa to that of malaria epidemics.

″You’ve been told AIDS is a venereal disease,″ he said. ″I’ve been working with a wide range of the world’s experts in the past 4 years and I tell you without quibbling that what most of what you heard from official sources is an outright lie.

″I agree AIDS is more easily transmitted by casual encounters among homosexuals and among drug users. But if there is a sufficient number of persons carrying the infection in any area, the number of ways of transmitting the infection is about as same as for any viral infection.″

According to medical experts, AIDS is spread most often through sexual contact, needles or syringes shared by drug abusers, infected blood or blood products, and from pregnant women to their offspring.

Surgeon General Everett Koop, in a November 1986 report on AIDS, said it cannot be spread by casual social conduct, such as coughing, sneezing or sharing eating utensils. The report said there are no known cases of AIDS transmission by insects.

LaRouche did not refer to his current trial in federal court in Boston, where he is charged with conspiring to obstruct a Justice Department investigation of alleged fund-raising fraud by his 1984 presidential campaign.

The program showed pictures, however, of state and federal agents who raided LaRouche’s Leesburg, Va., headquarters in October 1986 to seize evidence that led to the federal charges against LaRouche and aides.

An announcer who hosted the LaRouche program but was not identified said LaRouche was ″hated and feared by the political establishment almost as much as he is hated by the men in Moscow.″

LaRouche, who defies traditional political labels, espouses eccentric views of global conspiracies involving prominent people. Among them, he contends that the Queen of England and the royal family are involved in drug trafficking.