LONDON (AP) — The latest developments in the lengthy British public inquiry into the 2006 poisoning death of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko.

7 p.m.

The White House isn't ruling out future punitive action against Russia after a British judge concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin probably approved a plan to kill a former FSB security service agent who had become a Kremlin critic.

The agent, Alexander Litvinenko, died in 2006 after drinking tea laced with radioactive poison.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters that officials would need to take a closer look at the judge's report before deciding if action is warranted.

The British government said Thursday that it would freeze the assets of the two main Russian suspects in Litvinenko's killing.

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4:35 p.m.

Russia's ambassador to London says a British inquiry's findings into Alexander Litvinenko's death is a "provocation."

Alexander Yakovenko says it is "absolutely unacceptable that the report concludes that the Russian state was in any way involved in the death of Mr. Litvinenko on British soil."

The British government summoned Yakovenko to the Foreign Office Thursday to express "deep concern" at the inquiry's finding that Russia's FSB security service likely ordered the killing, probably with the knowledge of President Vladimir Putin.

The Foreign Office called the findings "deeply disturbing, demonstrating a flagrant disregard for U.K. law, international law and standards of conduct, and the safety of U.K. citizens."

Europe Minister David Lidington repeated Britain's demand that Russia hand over the two prime suspects.

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4:20 p.m.

Russian officials are sharply criticizing the conclusions of a British inquiry into the 2006 poisoning death of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko.

British Judge Robert Owen says Litvinenko was given tea laced with polonium-210 at a London hotel in November 2006. He says there's a "strong probability" that Russia' FSB spy agency directed the killing and the operation was "probably approved" by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

But Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters Thursday that "such a quasi-investigation such as the one being talked about today undoubtedly is able only to still further poison the atmosphere of our bilateral relations." Peskov said the report "cannot be accepted by us as a verdict."

Russia's Investigative Committee said the Litvinenko investigation ceased being a criminal investigation and had transformed into a full-fledged political event last year.

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11:50 a.m.

The British government says it will freeze the assets of Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun, the two main Russian suspects in the killing of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko.

Home Secretary Theresa May, who is in charge of justice issues, also told lawmakers that the government is summoning the Russian ambassador to the Foreign Office to express its "profound displeasure."

May said that the conclusion that the Russian state is probably involved in the murder of Litvinenko was "deeply disturbing." She described it as a "blatant and unacceptable breach of international law and civilized behavior."

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10:55 a.m.

Russia's Foreign Ministry says Moscow does not consider the conclusions of a British inquiry into the 2006 poisoning death of a former Russian spy to be impartial because it claims the result had been predetermined.

 Spokeswoman Maria Zhakarova says in a statement Thursday that "we regret that a purely criminal case has been politicized and has darkened the general atmosphere of bilateral relations."

Zhakarova adds "clearly the decision to suspend the coroner's inquest and begin 'public hearings' was politically motivated."

British Judge Robert Owen says Litvinenko was given tea laced with a fatal dose of polonium-210 at a London hotel in November 2006. He says there's a "strong probability" that Russia' FSB spy agency directed the killing and the operation was "probably approved" by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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10:40 a.m.

A Russian lawmaker named by a British inquiry as one of the possible killers of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko is calling the charges against him "absurd."

Andrei Lugovoi, now a member of the Russian parliament, tells the Interfax news agency on Thursday "the results of the investigation that were announced today once again confirm London's anti-Russian position and the blinkered view and unwillingness of the British to establish the true cause of Litvinenko's death."

British Judge Robert Owen says Litvinenko was given tea laced with a fatal dose of polonium-210 at a London hotel in November 2006. He says there's a "strong probability" that Russia' FSB spy agency directed the killing and the operation was "probably approved" by President Vladimir Putin.

Lugovoi insists the inquiry just allows Britain to further its political interests and says "I hope that this polonium trial will debunk the myth of the impartiality of British justice."

As a lawmaker, he is now immune from prosecution in Russia.

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10:05 a.m.

The widow of poisoned former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko is relieved with the verdict of a British public inquiry into his death and is urging the British government to take steps against Russian agents operating inside Britain.

Marina Litvinenko said Thursday outside the High Court in London she was "very pleased that the words my husband spoke on his deathbed, when he accused Mr. Putin, have been proved by an English court."

Judge Robert Owen said Thursday he is certain that Litvinenko was given tea laced with a fatal dose of polonium-210 at a London hotel in November 2006. He says there is a "strong probability" that the FSB directed the killing and the operation was "probably approved" by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Owen said Litvinenko "had repeatedly targeted President Putin" with "highly personal" public criticism.

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9:40 a.m.

A British judge says Russian President Vladimir Putin probably approved a plan by Russia's FSB security service to kill former agent Alexander Litvinenko.

Judge Robert Owen said Thursday he is certain that Litvinenko was given tea laced with a fatal dose of polonium-210 at a London hotel in November 2006. He says there's a "strong probability" that the FSB directed the killing, and the operation was "probably approved" by Putin.

Litvinenko, a vocal critic of Putin, died after he was poisoned with polonium-210. He had fled from Russian to Britain in 2000 after breaking with Putin and his inner circle.

British police have accused Dmitry Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi of carrying out the killing, sponsored by elements in the Kremlin. Both deny involvement, and Moscow refuses to extradite them.

The case led to a souring of British ties with Russia.