AP NEWS

Drug ring charges issued

November 5, 2017 GMT

KINGMAN —Three people allegedly involved in a Bullhead City opioid ring are now in Mohave County Jail.

Darcia Haley Rohrer, 20, of Mohave Valley, is charged with two counts of acquisition of a narcotic drug by fraud and two counts of forgery. She is being held in county jail on a $5,000 bond.

Matthew Austin Solari, 30, of Needles, is charged with fraud, acquisition of a narcotic drug by fraud and forgery. He is being held on a $10,000 bond.

Mark Christopher Mannor, 27, of Needles, is charged with two counts of fraud, three counts of acquisition of a narcotic drug by fraud and three counts of forgery. He is being held on a $10,000 bond.

Koryn Elle Tinnell, 22, of Needles, and Jordan Waters, 21, of Fort Mohave, were each arraigned in Mohave County Superior Court on Oct. 26 on charges of fraud, acquisition of a narcotic drug by fraud and forgery. They are not in custody.

The alleged ringleader, Amanda Lee Doyle, 29, of Fort Mohave, is charged with two counts of fraudulent schemes and artifices, eight counts of acquisition of a narcotic drug by fraud, seven counts of computer tampering, eight counts of forgery and one count of taking the identity of another. An arrest warrant has been issued for Doyle. Anyone with information on her whereabouts should call 602-542-8419 or local law enforcement.

Gavin Robel, 25, of Lake Havasu City is also charged with fraud, acquisition of a narcotic drug by fraud and forgery. Robel was recently arrested in California and is expected to be extradited to Mohave County.

An eighth suspect was also indicted on five felony counts but has not been identified. All 55 counts occurred between October 2015 and January 2016. The cases will be heard in Mohave County Superior Court.

Doyle had worked as a medical billing assistant at a Bullhead City medical office. She allegedly used her position to create fake electronic prescriptions for oxycodone tablets, recruiting fictitious patients so she could create profiles to write the prescriptions.

Those patients were never seen by a doctor. Doyle allegedly wrote fraudulent prescriptions, then demanded the patients give back some of the oxycodone tablets after the prescriptions were filled.