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The Latest: Gun-seizure law advances to New Mexico Senate

February 14, 2019
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New Mexico state Rep. Miguel Garcia of Albuquerque presents a bill to raise the statewide minimum wage on the floor of the House of Representatives in Santa Fe, N.M., Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019. The bill would raise the minimum wage for the first time in a decade. Deliberations also were scheduled on a bill making it easier to take guns away from people who may be suicidal or bent on violence. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee)
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New Mexico state Rep. Miguel Garcia of Albuquerque presents a bill to raise the statewide minimum wage on the floor of the House of Representatives in Santa Fe, N.M., Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019. The bill would raise the minimum wage for the first time in a decade. Deliberations also were scheduled on a bill making it easier to take guns away from people who may be suicidal or bent on violence. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee)

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The Latest on deliberation about minimum wage and gun control in the New Mexico Legislature (all times local):

11:40 p.m.

A bill that would make it easier to take guns away from people in New Mexico who may be suicidal or bent on violence has been approved by the New Mexico House of Representatives and sent to the Senate for consideration.

The 39-30 vote took place after three hours of emotionally charged debate that included personal testimonials from lawmakers about gun violence.

The bill would allow police or household members to seek court orders requiring people deemed threatening to temporarily surrender their guns.

Firearms could be taken away for up to a year by court order. People accused of being an imminent threat would have to right to an appeals hearing within 15 days.

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s support for the initiative was on display as she met with student advocates for gun safety legislation and the sponsors of the bill in the hallways of the Capitol.

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8:50 p.m.

The New Mexico House of Representatives has approved a bill that would raise the statewide minimum wage from $7.50 an hour to $12 by mid-2021.

The 44-26 vote in the Democrat-led House sends the bill to the Senate for consideration. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham supports the main provisions of the initiative.

The bill from Democratic Rep. Miguel Garcia of Albuquerque would gradually phase out an exemption to the minimum wage for tipped workers.

Under current law, businesses can pay workers as little as $2.13 an hour if they earn enough tips to surpass the state’s minimum hourly wage.

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3 p.m.

The New Mexico House of Representatives is poised to vote on a proposal to raise the state’s minimum wage for the first time in a decade and another that would make it easier to take guns away from people who may be suicidal or bent on violence.

Deliberation on the bills arrives as Democrats test the Legislature’s appetite for signature proposals on climate change, gun control, the minimum wage and abortion.

The minimum wage would rise from $7.50 an hour to $12 by July 2021 and eliminate an exemption for tipped workers at restaurants under a Democrat-sponsored bill.

House Speaker Brian Egolf says voters want to see results after giving Democrats a mandate for change with the election of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and an expanded Democratic House majority.

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