AP NEWS

Business Highlights

January 7, 2020 GMT

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Facebook bans deepfakes in fight against online manipulation

LONDON (AP) — Facebook says it’s banning “deepfake” videos as it steps up efforts to fight online manipulation. The social network said Monday it’s beefing up its policies to remove the the false but realistic clips created with artificial intelligence. The company said the new rules won’t include parody or satire, or clips edited just to change the order of words. The exceptions underscore the balancing act Facebook faces as it struggles to stop the spread of online misinformation and “fake news” while also respecting free speech.

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Sex tech from female-led startups at CES gadget show

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Sex tech makes an appearance at the CES gadget show opening Tuesday after organizers endured scorn for revoking an innovation award last year to a sex device company led by a female founder. Lora DiCarlo, the company in question, will showcase its Osé massager device, joining nearly a dozen other companies focused on vibrators, lube dispensers and other sex tech products. It’s been a long process for many sex tech companies to convince investors that they are part of a growing trend, as founders face decency arguments and entrenched corporate standards that equated them with porn. The four-day CES show in Las Vegas runs through Friday.

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Boeing now saying pilots need simulator training for 737 Max

CHICAGO (AP) — Boeing now says pilots should be trained in a flight simulator before they carry passengers on the 737 Max airliner. That’s a change in the company’s long-held position that computer-based training alone would be adequate. Boeing says it’s making the new recommendation is based on changes to the plane, test results and a commitment to the safe return of the Max. The plane has been grounded worldwide since two crashes that killed 346 people. The final decision will be up to regulators including the Federal Aviation Administration.

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Uber to let riders use pin codes to help identify right car

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber is offering riders a four-digit pin code to help ensure they’re getting into the right car. The ride-hailing company is rolling out the new feature across the U.S. and Canada. The development follows the death of 21-year-old Samantha “Sami” Josephson, who was murdered in March after getting into the car of a man impersonating an Uber driver. Since then, states have been pushing for additional safety requirements for Uber drivers. Riders can choose whether or not to use Uber’s new pin code feature.

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Pharmacies say prescribers bear opioid crisis responsibility

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Pharmacy chains are fighting claims that they’re to blame for the opioid crisis in two Ohio counties. Cuyahoga and Summit counties argue that chains such as CVS, Rite Aid and Walgreens contributed to the problem by filling an “excessive volume” of opioid prescriptions. A trial focusing on those claims is scheduled for later this year.

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US services firms grew at a faster pace last month

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. services companies grew more quickly in December than the previous month, a sign that the economy’s steady expansion should continue. The Institute for Supply Management said Tuesday that its service-sector index rose to 55, from 53.9 in November. Any reading above 50 signals an expansion. The index covers retail, health care, hotels and restaurants, and professional services, among other sectors.

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Japan issues arrest warrant for Nissan ex-chair’s wife

TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo prosecutors have issued an arrest warrant for former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn’s wife on suspicion of perjury. That adds to the couple’s legal troubles in the country where he once was revered as a star executive. The move comes after Ghosn skipped bail and fled to Lebanon while he was awaiting trial for alleged financial misconduct. Details on the allegations against Carole Ghosn, who is not in Japan, were not immediately available.

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White House proposes guidelines for regulating the use of AI

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House has proposed guidelines to regulate the use of artificial intelligence in medicine, transportation and other industries. Officials say the rules are intended to promote safe and fair AI applications in the private sector that reflect American values. They’re also meant to block U.S. regulators from holding AI to such a high standard that society can’t enjoy the benefits. Critics say they’re too vague to hold potentially harmful AI systems accountable.

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US stock indexes slip, but rush for safety slows

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks mostly fell on Tuesday, but the big rush for safety that coursed through global markets after the United States killed a top Iranian general on Friday slowed. Gold’s momentum eased a day after touching its highest price in nearly seven years, several Asian and European stock markets clawed back much of their losses from Monday and benchmark U.S. crude dropped for the first time in four days.

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The S&P 500 fell 9.10 points, or 0.3%, to 3,237.18. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 119.70, or 0.4%, to 28,583.68, and the Nasdaq composite slipped 2.88, or less than 0.1%, to 9,068.58. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks fell 4.95 points, or 0.3%, to 1658.31.