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Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.
PRESS RELEASE: Paid content from Globe Newswire
Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

“Survival of the Slowest” takes its time in Denver starting Oct. 22

October 13, 2021 GMT

In the new, traveling exhibition at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, guests meet live animals and realize some of the advantages of being slow, small or weak.

DENVER, Oct. 13, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sometimes being slow has advantages. In “Survival of the Slowest” you’ll meet live animals such as a two-toed sloth, a green iguana, a spur-thighed tortoise, a hedgehog and several other species that manage to thrive in a world where large, strong and fast animals are often at the top of the food chain. Explore dozens of habitats teeming with live animals, and discover their counterintuitive adaptations and surprising strategies for survival.

You will learn how general biology concepts apply in the real world and how survival in the animal world is all about trade-offs—some are cold-blooded, others warm-blooded; some are adapted to need food less frequently than others; and some find unique ways to hide from their adversaries.

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Most people know why it is good to be bigger, stronger, faster. But evolving to be slower as a mechanism for survival? Many animals have evolved to slow down as part of their survival strategy. “Survival of the Slowest” encourages you to slow down and consider some of the advantages of being slow along with some of the disadvantages of being fast.

“We are extremely fortunate to have this exhibition come to us here at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science,” said Frank-Thorsten Krell, Ph.D., “Survival of the Slowest” and senior entomology curator. “We have this wonderful opportunity to showcase nature’s small and adaptive animals. Through this exhibition, you’ll experience firsthand how these animals survive in illustrious habitats and how they interact with their world. Plus, you get to meet these animals in person and speak with caretakers about their personalities and preferences!”

Media Preview

Advance tours of the exhibition for reporters on assignment will be conducted Oct. 18 and 19. Contact Maura O’Neal to confirm a time at maura.oneal@dmns.org. For more information, photos and videos, visit the online press kit.

“Survival of the Slowest” was produced by Little Ray’s Exhibitions and FARE—Foundation For Animal Rescue And Education.

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About the Denver Museum of Nature & Science
The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is the Rocky Mountain Region’s leading resource for informal science education. Our mission is to be a catalyst and ignite the community’s passion for nature and science. The Museum envisions an empowered community that loves, understands and protects our natural world. A variety of engaging exhibits, discussions and activities help Museum visitors celebrate and understand the wonders of Colorado, Earth and the universe. The Museum is located at 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO, 80205. To learn more about the Museum, visit dmns.org or call 303.370.6000. Many of the Museum’s educational programs and exhibits are made possible in part by the citizens of the seven-county metro area through the Scientific & Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). The Museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Connect with the Museum on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

CONTACT

Maura O’Neal

303.370.6407 • maura.oneal@dmns.org

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/6aa6435c-5e8d-4784-9205-1aceabe895b8